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QuitNowTeam
Quit 1 year 4 months ago posted 2 years ago
Hello and welcome to the Community Forum!

Whether you’re thinking about quitting, have set a quit date, or have quit and are continuing to experience a tobacco-free life, this Forum is for you. We encourage you to share your own quit story, and support one another through challenges and milestones, in the path to better health.

We are cheering for you, and know you can do it for the long-term!

~ QuitNow Team
23 Comments last reply 3 months ago
Lucille Brown Log in or register to post comments
Quit 7 years 2 months ago Commented 2 years ago
There's no time like the present to take a chance. It may be the best decision you've ever made and if you value your health and your life well worth it. There is no better feeling than knowing your hard earned dollars are going back into your own pockets and not that of those who continue to poison us with their tobacco products.
ritarunningshoe Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 10 months ago Commented 1 year 10 months ago
Thank you Liz and Lucille! Appreciate your encouragement and advice.
I did read Carr’s book and even tried his method a long time ago. And here I am again!
Thanks again!
SheilaT Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 10 months ago Commented 1 year 7 months ago
Yes I'm free of that gross habit for over 1 year. I've smoked for over 30 years. It took several tries but I did it.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 7 months ago Commented 1 year 7 months ago
Rita I am just seeing your message now … I hope you are still hanging on ❤️ SheilaT congrats 👏🎉👏🎉👏🎉👏. It’s the best feeling to know we made it this long. Here’s to a lifetime of freedom!!! 🌹
Owlsnest Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 1 year 5 months ago
I started smoking at age 14. I have had cancer twice. I love my wife and family and want to live.
Happiness Log in or register to post comments
Quit 4 years 6 months ago Commented 1 year 4 months ago
Hello Quit Now Team.

Your work here is invaluable. Keep up the great support.

I believe in staying connected to a site like this after quitting as to remind us how grateful we should be to be free and to STAY free. When I joined however, it assumed that I am quitting smoking from day 1 although I have been quit for over 3 years. How can I fix this? It is confusing to others.
Happiness Log in or register to post comments
Quit 4 years 6 months ago Commented 1 year 4 months ago
I fixed my quit time by clicking my name in the upper right hand corner which dropped a menu. From there where it asked how many cigarettes smoked, after entering "other" I had forgotten to enter "none" in the box provided. Don't forget to "save" at the end.

Thanks to Green Meenie answering and I hope this is where it can help others too.
msgofor1@yahoo.com Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 1 year 3 months ago
Hi I have breathing and sure truth problem
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 13 years 3 months ago Commented 1 year 1 month ago
Hello msgofor1, thank you for sharing some very powerful reasons for wanting to quit. Quitting can certainly help improve your breathing and overall health! If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to share on the forum or give us a shout through chat or by phone at 1-877-455-2233 if you're seeking free one-on-one support with your own QuitCoach! Wishing you all the best in your quit journey and looking forward to hearing more from you!
Sue C Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 months 1 week ago Commented 1 year ago
Thanks for the words of encouragement. Day 1 for me. Been reading all the posts and finding them all positive. Thanks all.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 7 months ago Commented 1 year ago
Sending good vibes today LittleSuell! You can do it!
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 13 years 3 months ago Commented 11 months 3 weeks ago
Hey SueC, welcome to the QuitNow Community! Sorry for the delay as your post was hidden in the comments. We are so happy to hear that you are enjoying the words of encouragement. We are here for you! We hope everything is going well with your quit!
capricorn Log in or register to post comments
Quit 11 months ago Commented 10 months 1 week ago
I’ve been contemplating. I’ve quit smoking many times over the years. For weeks, months, even years at a time but I’ve always taken it up again. I’m very much an empath and I feel very deeply. I think I was smoking for the certainty of it in a very uncertain world. Certainty of the puff being there when I needed it. Certainty of the headaches, congestion, low energy, self hatred. Horrible certainties but certainties just the same. You know how they say “smoking can kill you” and the reply from smokers is “ yeah well so can a big truck “. I’m going to embrace uncertainty because to be frank, I’d rather live a glorious day today and get hit by a truck tomorrow than to feel like sh*t every day and never get hit by a truck in my life ❤️
ShirleyParadis Log in or register to post comments
Quit 10 months 1 week ago Commented 10 months 1 week ago
Yes but I dislike the withdrawals
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 13 years 3 months ago Commented 10 months ago
Hello capricorn, congratulations on being smoke-free! It is very common to have multiple quit attempts before quitting completely. What's important is that you continue to take important information from each attempt. This might include what triggered the slip or how you might handle a similar situation if it were to happen in your next quit. Every quit attempt is a learning opportunity! We're so glad that you are working hard to remain smoke-free and are focusing on something YOU can do to lower your risks of health complications related to smoking! Keep up the great work capricorn!
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 13 years 3 months ago Commented 10 months ago
Welcome ShirleyParadis to the QuitNow Community! Congrats on being nearly 3 days smoke-free! Withdrawals can certainly be an unpleasant experience while our bodies are healing from the nicotine addiction. Thankfully there are things than can help make withdrawal more manageable. You might consider adding new and existing routines that can keep you occupied during this process. Adding relaxation techniques such as: deep breathing, listening to soft music, talking with family and friends are all great coping strategies. You might also consider speaking to your Pharmacist or doctor if you are looking to use (NRT) Nicotine Replacement Therapy products such as the patch, gum or lozenges. NRT can reduce your cravings and urges to smoke by providing your body with a clean dose of nicotine. Smoking cessation medications including Champix and Zyban can also be helpful to reduce withdrawal symptoms. These can be prescribed to you by your doctor. Wising you all the best as you progress further into your quit ShirleyParadis!
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 13 years 3 months ago Commented 7 months 3 weeks ago
Hello johngreen, so great that you are thinking about quitting! We appreciate you sharing what has worked for you, however we do not allow any commercial solicitation or flagrant promotion of goods, sites or services. We may remove any URL for any reason. Thank you for your understanding and wishing you all the best in your quit journey!
Vincent Edward Chaplin Moffit Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 7 months ago Commented 4 months 4 weeks ago
I need to have hip replacement surgery in about, and must quit from 30 to 45 days before surgery to help avoid complications like infection, and blood clots

What is the best, and easiest way to quit cold turkey?
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 13 years 3 months ago Commented 4 months 3 weeks ago
Hello Vincent and welcome to the QuitNow Community! We are very thankful to have you join us in the journey to being and staying smoke-free! You certainly have a very powerful motivator, quitting to avoid complications with upcoming surgery. You are making changes to better your health, congratulations! It can be helpful to try gradual reduction and to create a quit plan to set yourself up for success. The gradual reduction method involves gradually cutting down the amount of cigarettes or other tobacco products you use each day. This can be done while using nicotine replacement therapy products (NRT) like the nicotine patch, gum, or lozenges to help manage nicotine cravings and withdrawal symptoms. It is also helpful to use behavioural techniques like the 4 Ds (Delay, Distract, Drink Water, Deep Breathing) or behavioural counselling to help manage cravings and withdrawal symptoms. A suggested approach to this method is to choose a quit date and slowly reduce the number of cigarettes you smoke each day. The gradual reduction method is proven to increase your chances of quit success in the long term. As for your quit plan, it might include:
1) Setting a quit date
2) Preparing your environment (removing ashtrays, lighters, cigarettes etc.)
3) Creating a written list that you can carry with you that includes: your reasons for quitting (you might find this list helpful to read when you are tempted)
4) Changing your habits (avoiding foods, drinks, places, situations etc. that you associate with smoking)
5) Selecting your quit method (this could be cold turkey, NRTs or prescription smoking cessation medication)
6) Incorporating daily exercise (can be a great way to work through stress/withdrawals symptoms)
7) Knowing your triggers and brainstorming to avoid them or work through them
8) Identifying your supports that can help you along the way (Family, friends, QuitNow Community etc)
9) Rewarding yourself for all your non-smoking achievements, no matter how small they might be.
If you would like to create a quit plan with the support of a QuitCoach, please don't hesitate to give us a call at 1-877-455-2233 for free one-on-one support
bmaclean Log in or register to post comments
Quit 4 months 3 weeks ago Commented 3 months 3 weeks ago
Hi,
I have to say i am pretty angry at myself , which does not help the quit process.
I had 60 days , no smoking , relapsed because I hurt my back quite badly .
My back still healing 1 month Feb. 7 .
Yesterday was my first day starting over . Got quite agitated once but I followed the 5 d’s.
Today is day 2 and I feel better about starting over .
It was hard to start over so I suggest you stay on your path to freedom . One day or minute at a time .
Peace and Love
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 13 years 3 months ago Commented 3 months 3 weeks ago
Hello bmaclean, so sorry to hear you hurt your back and this resulted in a slip. Please know that the hard work you have put into your quit is not gone! Congratulations on being able to go 60 days smoke-free and for getting back on track! Those are both amazing accomplishments! It can be challenging to get back on track after a slip but you have proven to yourself that YOU CAN DO IT! Keep up the great work bmaclean and the reasons why you've decided to make this incredible change in mind as you progress further into your quit! One day or minute at a time! You've got this!🏆
Vincent Edward Chaplin Moffit Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 7 months ago Commented 3 months 3 weeks ago
P.S. I only quite a little less than one month ago. Soon, I will have titanium put in my hip, and then back to China. I wish that I knew what to say or how to say it but no one is invisible from death as the result of smoking including you. For you, your FAMILY, AND FRIEND PLEASE, PLEASE QUITE. I WILL NOT WISH YOU LUCK, JUST PLEASE DO IT. DO NOT DIE FROM LUNG CANCER.. MY FINAL POST HERE EVERY ONE.
bmaclean Log in or register to post comments
Quit 4 months 3 weeks ago Commented 3 months 3 weeks ago
I am on day 5 after relapse ( had 60 days)
It has been so hard to start over that I am determine I will quit
smoking . I use all the tools 4-d’s and use the lozenges to stop
cravings .
Today was a stressful day as I had ordered a laundry basket , with handle and four wheels .
This was do to my back injury , healing 1 month.
The delivery got delayed in Delta , that frustrated me and I could not get the
guy to phone me back from the bank .
Tomorrow I will not try so hard to get everything accomplished .
Just go with the flow and breathe . No cravings today .
Did not go into any trigger areas . My neighbour walked my dog for 1 hr. and 1/2
I never used to let people help me but since this bad back injury , I have had to let go.
I like the idea of climbing the rope , I am very visual , so i can see it.
Thanks for all the inspiring stories . They really help me.
Peace to everyone .
Shellbell
Quitting in 4 weeks posted 1 hour 57 min ago
I am a 61 year old female currently diagnosed with COPD. It has finally come to this to get me to quit. To me, that is sad. I cough non stop and so tired of it and being an outcast. I have tried probably 20 times in my life to quit, obviously all unsuccessful. I have a new grand baby and another on the way and I want to see them grow up. My mom died with this disease and I saw her suffer and suffocate and it horrifies me. My quit plan starts with reducing as I’m a pack a day smoker, so already have reduced to 15 a day. Any help or advice would be appreciated as I’ve never joined a forum before and looking forward to any help I can get. Thanks for reading my story!
1 Comment last reply 19 min ago
QuitCoach Mackenzie Log in or register to post comments
Quit 10 years 6 months ago Commented 19 min 13 sec ago
Hi Shellbell,

Welcome :), I am so happy to see you have found our forum. Our community has a variety of individuals who are at different stages of their quit journey; I think you will find it a very supportive space. I love to see that you have set a quit date and established a plan; that is a huge step towards success! Your motivation to quit for your health, family and wellness is powerful and I can tell you are dedicated and ready to be nicotine free. I am so proud of you for starting your journey and wish you much success along the way.

Having support in your corner will prepare you when you are facing challenging moments. If you haven't connected already, we have a wonderful group of QuitCoaches that is available to you at any stage of your quit. You can connect with us at 1-877-455-2233.
Gilmour33.
Quitting in 2 weeks 6 days posted 8 hours 22 min ago
I've been smoking since the age of 12 13 years old.. I now have 2 diseases and have to quit for my health
1 Comment last reply 2 hours ago
QuitCoach Mackenzie Log in or register to post comments
Quit 10 years 6 months ago Commented 2 hours 39 min ago
Hi Gilmour33,

I would like to express my warm welcome to the forum and also congratulate you on setting a quit date. WE are here to support you every step of the way. We have a wonderful community network that interacts on the forum to show others it is possible and show you that you are not alone.

People of all ages experience immediate and long term health benefits from quitting smoking. If you haven't connected already, we have a group of QuitCoaches that you are able to connect with to receive further support on your journey. Our number is 1-877-455-2233 please connect with us anytime :)
Serge
Quitting today posted 10 hours 50 min ago
I just smoked the last cigarette of my life. A challenging few days are coming up. I’m so glad I have such great friends that are all non-smokers & have accepted to be there for me. I will keep coming back here to get even more support
1 Comment last reply 2 hours ago
QuitCoach Mackenzie Log in or register to post comments
Quit 10 years 6 months ago Commented 2 hours 58 min ago
Hi Serge,

Congratulations! So happy to hear you have a great support system to rely on during your journey. The next few days may be challenging but with motivation, and a positive mindset you will be seeing brighter days in no time.

You have decided to quit smoking to live happily and stay healthy. . Keep it up and congratulations!
QuitCoach Kristena
Quit 5 years 2 months ago posted 1 day 3 hours ago
Did you know people who attend group-based support programs are 50%-130% more likely to quit smoking? And guess what- we offer group support sessions every 1st Monday of the month with different topics each time!

You can join the session by phoning in and choose to remain anonymous or collaborate with others and share your story. These sessions offer a safe space where you can feel motivated and encouraged to keep striving in your quitting journey as you gain insight into quit aids and receive support from people who are in the exact same journey as you!

This coming session's topic is on "Quit Aids 101" at 7pm on Monday, June 5th.

In this session, we’ll dive into the quit aids available to help you quit smoking (aka pharmacotherapy).
We’ll help you to understand the product options and their potential side-effects.

We’ll talk about common myths and misconceptions and the truths about Nicotine Replacement Therapy use and additional considerations.

Join us to learn about quit aids and how they may be helpful for you!

Just call the number below and enter the access code to join the support session:
Call 1-877-385-4099
Enter Participant Access Code: 4356609#

Can't wait to have you all there! :)
Quit Coach Linda
Quit 8 years 4 months ago posted 1 day 14 hours ago
Celebrating every little victory along the way can help us achieve big goals and keep us motivated throughout our quit journey. Taking the time to celebrate small wins and every little accomplishment can make a huge difference in our quitting process.

Being aware and mindful of each progress we make will reinforce our motivation to keep going and give us the strength, courage and perseverance to continue with our journey to a wonderful smoke-free life and freedom.

There are numerous benefits of celebrating small victories: it will increase our self-confidence and self-esteem; each little accomplishment can make us realize that we have extraordinary skills and potential and we can accomplish great things with success; it can give us an internal sense of pride, satisfaction and happiness; the good emotion we feel brings positivity into our life and builds hope and confidence; it can make our quit journey more enjoyable and motivating as we expect something positive and exciting at each milestone and it will help us stay on course towards achieving greater and long-term goals.

As we can see, we have so much to gain from celebrating every little success. Do not hesitate to recognize and honor every small victory and keep celebrating every step of the way!
Jamwan
Quit 11 months 3 weeks ago posted 1 day 18 hours ago
I am 11 months 17 days clean as of today. I have not touched a single cigarette since then. I struggle a lot with depression and it was a major motivation for me to smoke.

I was heavily smoking marijuana at the same time to get even more buzzed, I quickly realized it was just a way to escape reality without actually doing so. I quit both at the same time with NRT, it worked quite effectively and now I am smoke free.

I did go back to vaping marijuana resin in march but I quickly realized I can’t keep going back to these things whenever I’m in immense stress. I quickly quit 2 weeks ago and I’m now on the right track again.

Having someone that’s beside you who can support you and cheer you up is extremely important, if it wasn’t for my wife I would’ve relapsed again.

Overall I am very happy with not having any issues with morning coughs and chest pain.

I will continue to work on curbing marijuana use whenever I feel stressed. I stopped smoking marijuana joints already and I’m planning to never touch a marijuana vape again too.

Hold the urge, it’s worth it in the long term. Just distract yourself with other things.
1 Comment last reply 1 day ago
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 22 years 3 months ago Commented 1 day 18 hours ago
Hi Jamwan, thank you for sharing your Quit journey with us on the community forum. I want to wish you a BIG CONGRATULATIONS!!! You have reached a huge milestone in remaining nicotine free now for over a year and I hope you are extraordinarily proud of yourself...we are so proud of you. Your journey has come with some struggles that you have shown such strength in overcoming and staying committed to your goal. It also sounds like you have gained some really valuable insight through your journey of what you want in your life and to me that will lead you to such a bright, beautiful smoke-free future. I am glad you have embraced having support in your Quit journey as well; you are right that it can be very powerful in staying strong to your convictions. Your health improvements will only continue to get better as well! Thank you again for being so transparent in sharing your journey. Here's to you and your smoke-free life !!
QuitCoach Keri
Quit 22 years 3 months ago posted 2 days ago
Just like the Beatles sang...We get by with a little Help from our Friends!

Quitting or reducing will be easier when you have friends and family on your side. Here are some tips for letting others support you:
• Let your loved ones know why you are quitting and when.
• Ask those that smoke to not smoke or vape around you or offer you a puff (even if you ask).
• Let them know you might be a bit grumpy or out of sorts for a while and to be patient.
• Ask them to organize activities where smoking or vaping is not an option.
• Ask someone to be your backup when attending events that might cause cravings.  

Outside of the support from your family and friends there are also other ways to access support along your quit journey. This online community forum is a wonderful, interactive group of individuals that are all on different phases of their quit journey. Engaging with like minded others can be a very effective way of creating a supportive environment for your quit journey. QuitNow also offers Group Support on a variety of different topics the first Monday of every month. Lastly, if you want the support of a QuitCoach you can reach out to us at 1-877-455-2233.

Create the supportive environment you need to make your personal Quit Journey as encouraging and successful as you can!
Quit Coach Linda
Quit 8 years 4 months ago posted 2 days 21 hours ago
Nicotine cravings can happen suddenly and appear at any moment of the day. Those cravings for cigarettes can be intense, especially during the first few days after quitting, and they will get better as we progress further into our quit journey. The worst of the physical cravings can occur during the first week after quitting. Then come the psychological cravings, which can last for a few weeks. It is normal to have cravings after we stopped smoking and they could start just 30 minutes after our last cigarette. While cravings can be strong and hard to resist, it is important to remember that they are short and last only 3 to 5 minutes. There are many methods and strategies to deal with nicotine cravings and here are some ideas:

- Drink water and sip slowly to keep your hands and mouth busy for a longer time. Some people find helpful to drink water or other beverages with a straw;
- Find some distractions and activities to keep yourselves busy such as doing some crosswords, puzzle, reading a good book, watching movies or listening to music;
- Practice deep breathing exercises and use relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation, massage etc.
- Delay a few minutes as the cravings don’t last very long and do something else;
- Keep your hands busy with the following activities: text a friend, play games on the phone, use a stress ball or a fidget toy, coloring, writing, drawing etc.
- Find new hobbies to reduce boredom and do something that you enjoy;
- Keep your mouth busy with the following activities: brushing your teeth, chewing a regular gum; eat sugarless mint candies; use a straw or cinnamon stick;
- Eat healthy snacks such as berries, fruits or cut vegetables etc.
- Do some physical activities or practice a sport that you like, going for a walk, play with children or pets;
- Talk to a healthcare professional about nicotine replacement therapies or quit medications;

Although it can be hard to resist an intense craving to smoke, it can be helpful to remind yourselves that cravings don’t last long and they will pass. Sometimes, they can be strong but you are stronger!
gregxfield
Quit 1 day 8 hours ago posted 3 days ago
I've had a fairly long history with nicotine. I started when I was 18, although I had tried it at an earlier age, and have quit 2 times prior to this attempt, when I was 25 and when I was 35. I relapsed about 11 months ago but been using NRT and some vaping/cigars for the last 3.5 months but haven't found much success on my own..
1 Comment last reply 3 days ago
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 22 years 3 months ago Commented 3 days ago
Hi gregxfield, and welcome to the community forum! Congratulations on setting a Quit Date for yourself. It sounds like you have gained some great insight as to what works for you and what doesn't from your previous quit attempts. The fact you had an 11 month previous quit shows a very successful quit, try to build on that success. Using the NRT can be quite effective in reducing the physical cravings, but I understand if you are still struggling in overcoming the long history with your nicotine habit. If you would like some further assistance in creating a Quit Plan please feel free to reach out to us at 1-877-455-2233. We believe in you !
Quit Coach Linda
Quit 8 years 4 months ago posted 3 days 19 hours ago
Hi everyone,

I hope you are enjoying the beautiful weather. The warm weather has arrived, and summer is fast approaching. What are your plans for your summer vacation?

For many people, summer vacations are an opportunity to rest, relax, travel and have good times with friends and family. For others, summer vacations can be ideal times to undertake new projects or take important steps towards positive changes in their lives such as quitting smoking.

Why the summer vacations are good times to quit smoking? One of the reasons mentioned by many people is they will have more time to focus on their quitting process during their vacation. Their schedule is generally less busy than during their workdays. Therefore, they have fewer professional obligations, and they can spend more time and energy into their quit. As we know, quitting smoking may require some preparation, hard work and effort from us especially during the first few weeks after quitting as cravings and withdrawal symptoms can be most intense during that period. Many people like to have some time off from work during the withdrawal period.

Moreover, another good reason for quitting during the summer vacation is the fact that we are generally more relaxed, less stressed and our routine can be different during our time off. Therefore, we can take those days off to break some associations that we have with cigarettes and change our tobacco habits.

On the other hand, we may have more chances to go out and participate in different outdoor activities and social events, so many more ways to distract ourselves from smoking. In short, we can learn to enjoy our free time without smoking during our vacation.

Finally, we may have more occasions to go out to the beach, restaurant terraces or festivals where smoking is not allowed, so there will be more opportunities to avoid smoking. Even though there is no perfect moment to quit smoking, a summer vacation can be a good time to say goodbye to cigarettes for many people. What are your thoughts on quitting smoking during a vacation or time off?
4 Comments last reply 1 day ago
Miles@ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 week ago Commented 3 days 13 hours ago
Hi Linda, I'm new here. I'm not on vacation. I've been off work for medical reasons, for 3yrs now. I started cutting myself down towards the end of April, 25/2023 and I quit smoking on May, 26/2023. I don't find I crave cigarettes until I get stressed with life challenges. When I can't resolve an issue. Do you have any tips to help me get past the cravings? I'm not sure if I should post, what stresses me the most. I won't post personal information.
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 8 years 4 months ago Commented 2 days 23 hours ago
Hi Miles, welcome to the QuitNow community and congratulations on being 4 days smoke-free! We are so glad you’re here and thank you for joining us today. We are sorry to hear that you’ve been off work for medical reasons. Please know we are here to support you in any way possible and do not hesitate to contact us anytime. You have 4 days smoke-free behind you now, that is so awesome! Keep going strong. The first week after quitting may not be easy and you may experience strong cravings and withdrawal symptoms. Please hang in there. Although they can be strong and hard to resist, it is important to remember that cravings are short and last only 3-5 minutes, and they will pass. As you progress into your quit, they will be less intense, and they will be fewer and farther apart. Many people find helpful to do the following after quitting: drink plenty of water; rest or take a nap when possible; reduce caffeine intake; try to eat healthier; find different ways to distract yourself from the thoughts of smoking; keep your hand or mouth busy such as brushing your teeth more often during the day; practice deep breathing; avoid your triggers when possible and come out with different ways to manage them; exercise or engage in physical activities such as going for a walk; use relaxation techniques such as meditation or yoga; let the people around you know that you may need their support; talk to a healthcare provider about nicotine replacement therapies or quit medications. You may also visit this link for more information on tips for cravings and withdrawal: https://quitnow.ca/stay-quit/surviving-quit-day/tips-craving-and-withdrawal You can do this! You have made an excellent preparation for your quit and the gradual reduction method worked well for you. Way to go! Please continue with all the things that will help you stay smoke-free and keep moving forward. You are on your way to a wonderful smoke-free life and freedom from nicotine addiction!
Miles@ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 week ago Commented 2 days 13 hours ago
Hi Linda, thank you so much for the advice, have a wonderful evening.
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 8 years 4 months ago Commented 1 day 17 hours ago
Hi Miles, thank you so much! Have a wonderful evening as well. Thank you for sharing your quit story with us. You are doing awesome at almost 1 week smoke-free! Keep going strong. You are heading towards the easy days and many amazing benefits await you. Congratulations on all the hard work you’ve put into reaching your goals and please keep us updated on your quit journey. We are all here cheering for you!
QuitCoach Keri
Quit 22 years 3 months ago posted 3 days 22 hours ago
Hello to my fellow Community Forum members!

I was looking at the average cost of a package of cigarettes in our great province; it is on average $15.51 for every 20 cigarettes we puff away. When I really thought of it we are quite literally burning our money! I know most people wouldn't take kindly if someone took a $20 bill from our hand and just lit the end of it and watched it burn. It sounds silly but that is what we choose every time we light a cigarette.

Just for the simple math I am going to do a little exercise for a person smoking one (1) package of cigarettes per day; so 20 cigarettes per day. In one week we would have had a nice little barbecue of $108.57. In the average month we would have a small campfire of $434.28. Over the course of the year the fire department would have to come because we would be burning $5645.64. If it sounds ridiculous to just burn our money, it is because we normally wouldn't do this action. If you are on the fence about quitting, or are in your early stages of your quit and are facing some of the hurdles you have to overcome think of that fire with your money burning away. Sometimes a visual is a good method of distraction. Also you could make a list of all the big, and small things you would like to do with that money you will have saved not smoking.

The cost of living right now is already so high, why not make it just a little more manageable?
CarmenS
Quit 1 month 2 weeks ago posted 4 days 23 hours ago
1 month and 11 days quit. Cold turkey. It's been hard. No lie. I talk to my quit coach weekly. I also have a goal and have begun training for a 5k in September. I used to jog. One thing thats hard is the depression and irritability. I get agitated. Hopefully the extra activity will continue to replace that dopamine in my brain. I hope everyone is well and I enjoy reading your stories
1 Comment last reply 4 days ago
QuitCoach Elke Log in or register to post comments
Quit 29 years 3 months ago Commented 4 days 21 hours ago
Congratulations on being smoke free for 1 month and 11 days CarmenS! It's great that you have set yourself that goal for the 5 k in September. You are right, regular physical activity can help to boost dopamine levels, which can positively improve our moods. So you are definitely on the right track! Things will get easier and withdrawal symptoms, such as lower mood and irritability will continue to decrease as you progress with your smoke free life. It may also help to find activities that you enjoy (maybe a new hobby?) and for self care (mindfulness, meditation, yoga etc.) to add to your daily routine, to have things to look forward too. Keep up the great work Carmen! You can do this!
Divya
Quit 1 week 4 days ago posted 5 days 19 hours ago
Guys I quit a few days ago and my skin is breaking out like crazy. Is it just my body’s way to flush out toxins or should I consult a doctor?
2 Comments last reply 3 days ago
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 years 2 months ago Commented 5 days 17 hours ago
Hi Divya, Congratulations on being smoke free for over 5 days! What an incredible accomplishment. Experiencing break outs can be common when your body is experiencing nicotine withdrawal symptoms. If these symptoms worsen, we recommend speaking with a health care provider. This is one of the many signs that your body is healing so although it may be uncomfortable, it can be helpful to view these withdrawal symptoms as a positive sign that your body is healing itself. Keep up the great work! We believe in you :)
Divya Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 week 4 days ago Commented 3 days 20 hours ago
Thanks a lot
Oldbluevw
Quitting in 1 week 6 days posted 6 days 8 hours ago
Try nicotine gum
1 Comment last reply 5 days ago
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 years 2 months ago Commented 5 days 22 hours ago
Hi Oldbluevw, congratulations on starting your quitting journey and welcome to the community forum! The nicotine gum can be an excellent quit aid to use in your quitting process and can combat triggers very quickly! If you would like to learn more about the gum and/or would like support in your quit journey feel free to reach out to us at 1-877-455-2233! We wish you the best of luck and are here to support you along the way!