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QuitNowTeam
Quit 2 years 2 months ago posted 2 years 10 months ago
Hello and welcome to the Community Forum!

Whether you’re thinking about quitting, have set a quit date, or have quit and are continuing to experience a tobacco-free life, this Forum is for you. We encourage you to share your own quit story, and support one another through challenges and milestones, in the path to better health.

We are cheering for you, and know you can do it for the long-term!

~ QuitNow Team
27 Comments last reply 3 months ago
Lucille Brown Log in or register to post comments
Quit 8 years 1 month ago Commented 2 years 10 months ago
There's no time like the present to take a chance. It may be the best decision you've ever made and if you value your health and your life well worth it. There is no better feeling than knowing your hard earned dollars are going back into your own pockets and not that of those who continue to poison us with their tobacco products.
ritarunningshoe Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 8 months ago Commented 2 years 8 months ago
Thank you Liz and Lucille! Appreciate your encouragement and advice.
I did read Carr’s book and even tried his method a long time ago. And here I am again!
Thanks again!
SheilaT Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 9 months ago Commented 2 years 5 months ago
Yes I'm free of that gross habit for over 1 year. I've smoked for over 30 years. It took several tries but I did it.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 2 years 5 months ago
Rita I am just seeing your message now … I hope you are still hanging on ❤️ SheilaT congrats 👏🎉👏🎉👏🎉👏. It’s the best feeling to know we made it this long. Here’s to a lifetime of freedom!!! 🌹
Owlsnest Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 3 months ago Commented 2 years 3 months ago
I started smoking at age 14. I have had cancer twice. I love my wife and family and want to live.
Happiness Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 years 5 months ago Commented 2 years 3 months ago
Hello Quit Now Team.

Your work here is invaluable. Keep up the great support.

I believe in staying connected to a site like this after quitting as to remind us how grateful we should be to be free and to STAY free. When I joined however, it assumed that I am quitting smoking from day 1 although I have been quit for over 3 years. How can I fix this? It is confusing to others.
Happiness Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 years 5 months ago Commented 2 years 3 months ago
I fixed my quit time by clicking my name in the upper right hand corner which dropped a menu. From there where it asked how many cigarettes smoked, after entering "other" I had forgotten to enter "none" in the box provided. Don't forget to "save" at the end.

Thanks to Green Meenie answering and I hope this is where it can help others too.
msgofor1@yahoo.com Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 2 months ago Commented 2 years 1 month ago
Hi I have breathing and sure truth problem
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 14 years 1 month ago Commented 2 years ago
Hello msgofor1, thank you for sharing some very powerful reasons for wanting to quit. Quitting can certainly help improve your breathing and overall health! If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to share on the forum or give us a shout through chat or by phone at 1-877-455-2233 if you're seeking free one-on-one support with your own QuitCoach! Wishing you all the best in your quit journey and looking forward to hearing more from you!
Sue C Log in or register to post comments
Quit 7 months 1 week ago Commented 1 year 11 months ago
Thanks for the words of encouragement. Day 1 for me. Been reading all the posts and finding them all positive. Thanks all.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 year 11 months ago
Sending good vibes today LittleSuell! You can do it!
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 14 years 1 month ago Commented 1 year 10 months ago
Hey SueC, welcome to the QuitNow Community! Sorry for the delay as your post was hidden in the comments. We are so happy to hear that you are enjoying the words of encouragement. We are here for you! We hope everything is going well with your quit!
capricorn Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 9 months ago Commented 1 year 8 months ago
I’ve been contemplating. I’ve quit smoking many times over the years. For weeks, months, even years at a time but I’ve always taken it up again. I’m very much an empath and I feel very deeply. I think I was smoking for the certainty of it in a very uncertain world. Certainty of the puff being there when I needed it. Certainty of the headaches, congestion, low energy, self hatred. Horrible certainties but certainties just the same. You know how they say “smoking can kill you” and the reply from smokers is “ yeah well so can a big truck “. I’m going to embrace uncertainty because to be frank, I’d rather live a glorious day today and get hit by a truck tomorrow than to feel like sh*t every day and never get hit by a truck in my life ❤️
ShirleyParadis Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 8 months ago Commented 1 year 8 months ago
Yes but I dislike the withdrawals
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 14 years 1 month ago Commented 1 year 8 months ago
Hello capricorn, congratulations on being smoke-free! It is very common to have multiple quit attempts before quitting completely. What's important is that you continue to take important information from each attempt. This might include what triggered the slip or how you might handle a similar situation if it were to happen in your next quit. Every quit attempt is a learning opportunity! We're so glad that you are working hard to remain smoke-free and are focusing on something YOU can do to lower your risks of health complications related to smoking! Keep up the great work capricorn!
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 14 years 1 month ago Commented 1 year 8 months ago
Welcome ShirleyParadis to the QuitNow Community! Congrats on being nearly 3 days smoke-free! Withdrawals can certainly be an unpleasant experience while our bodies are healing from the nicotine addiction. Thankfully there are things than can help make withdrawal more manageable. You might consider adding new and existing routines that can keep you occupied during this process. Adding relaxation techniques such as: deep breathing, listening to soft music, talking with family and friends are all great coping strategies. You might also consider speaking to your Pharmacist or doctor if you are looking to use (NRT) Nicotine Replacement Therapy products such as the patch, gum or lozenges. NRT can reduce your cravings and urges to smoke by providing your body with a clean dose of nicotine. Smoking cessation medications including Champix and Zyban can also be helpful to reduce withdrawal symptoms. These can be prescribed to you by your doctor. Wising you all the best as you progress further into your quit ShirleyParadis!
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 14 years 1 month ago Commented 1 year 6 months ago
Hello johngreen, so great that you are thinking about quitting! We appreciate you sharing what has worked for you, however we do not allow any commercial solicitation or flagrant promotion of goods, sites or services. We may remove any URL for any reason. Thank you for your understanding and wishing you all the best in your quit journey!
Vincent Edward Chaplin Moffit Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 5 months ago Commented 1 year 3 months ago
I need to have hip replacement surgery in about, and must quit from 30 to 45 days before surgery to help avoid complications like infection, and blood clots

What is the best, and easiest way to quit cold turkey?
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 14 years 1 month ago Commented 1 year 3 months ago
Hello Vincent and welcome to the QuitNow Community! We are very thankful to have you join us in the journey to being and staying smoke-free! You certainly have a very powerful motivator, quitting to avoid complications with upcoming surgery. You are making changes to better your health, congratulations! It can be helpful to try gradual reduction and to create a quit plan to set yourself up for success. The gradual reduction method involves gradually cutting down the amount of cigarettes or other tobacco products you use each day. This can be done while using nicotine replacement therapy products (NRT) like the nicotine patch, gum, or lozenges to help manage nicotine cravings and withdrawal symptoms. It is also helpful to use behavioural techniques like the 4 Ds (Delay, Distract, Drink Water, Deep Breathing) or behavioural counselling to help manage cravings and withdrawal symptoms. A suggested approach to this method is to choose a quit date and slowly reduce the number of cigarettes you smoke each day. The gradual reduction method is proven to increase your chances of quit success in the long term. As for your quit plan, it might include:
1) Setting a quit date
2) Preparing your environment (removing ashtrays, lighters, cigarettes etc.)
3) Creating a written list that you can carry with you that includes: your reasons for quitting (you might find this list helpful to read when you are tempted)
4) Changing your habits (avoiding foods, drinks, places, situations etc. that you associate with smoking)
5) Selecting your quit method (this could be cold turkey, NRTs or prescription smoking cessation medication)
6) Incorporating daily exercise (can be a great way to work through stress/withdrawals symptoms)
7) Knowing your triggers and brainstorming to avoid them or work through them
8) Identifying your supports that can help you along the way (Family, friends, QuitNow Community etc)
9) Rewarding yourself for all your non-smoking achievements, no matter how small they might be.
If you would like to create a quit plan with the support of a QuitCoach, please don't hesitate to give us a call at 1-877-455-2233 for free one-on-one support
bmaclean Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 3 months ago Commented 1 year 2 months ago
Hi,
I have to say i am pretty angry at myself , which does not help the quit process.
I had 60 days , no smoking , relapsed because I hurt my back quite badly .
My back still healing 1 month Feb. 7 .
Yesterday was my first day starting over . Got quite agitated once but I followed the 5 d’s.
Today is day 2 and I feel better about starting over .
It was hard to start over so I suggest you stay on your path to freedom . One day or minute at a time .
Peace and Love
QuitCoach Katerina Log in or register to post comments
Quit 14 years 1 month ago Commented 1 year 2 months ago
Hello bmaclean, so sorry to hear you hurt your back and this resulted in a slip. Please know that the hard work you have put into your quit is not gone! Congratulations on being able to go 60 days smoke-free and for getting back on track! Those are both amazing accomplishments! It can be challenging to get back on track after a slip but you have proven to yourself that YOU CAN DO IT! Keep up the great work bmaclean and the reasons why you've decided to make this incredible change in mind as you progress further into your quit! One day or minute at a time! You've got this!🏆
Vincent Edward Chaplin Moffit Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 5 months ago Commented 1 year 2 months ago
P.S. I only quite a little less than one month ago. Soon, I will have titanium put in my hip, and then back to China. I wish that I knew what to say or how to say it but no one is invisible from death as the result of smoking including you. For you, your FAMILY, AND FRIEND PLEASE, PLEASE QUITE. I WILL NOT WISH YOU LUCK, JUST PLEASE DO IT. DO NOT DIE FROM LUNG CANCER.. MY FINAL POST HERE EVERY ONE.
bmaclean Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 3 months ago Commented 1 year 2 months ago
I am on day 5 after relapse ( had 60 days)
It has been so hard to start over that I am determine I will quit
smoking . I use all the tools 4-d’s and use the lozenges to stop
cravings .
Today was a stressful day as I had ordered a laundry basket , with handle and four wheels .
This was do to my back injury , healing 1 month.
The delivery got delayed in Delta , that frustrated me and I could not get the
guy to phone me back from the bank .
Tomorrow I will not try so hard to get everything accomplished .
Just go with the flow and breathe . No cravings today .
Did not go into any trigger areas . My neighbour walked my dog for 1 hr. and 1/2
I never used to let people help me but since this bad back injury , I have had to let go.
I like the idea of climbing the rope , I am very visual , so i can see it.
Thanks for all the inspiring stories . They really help me.
Peace to everyone .
@@@@@@Kevin Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 7 months 1 week ago
Hi Keri I'm.glad I reconnected.with you.my actual initial.phone.coach so.i ahs to.bimp my quit a month.later my mind is very mixed up with many stresses I'm dealing with the biggest of course cancer but I'm trying.to get through.this
quitnow2024 Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months ago Commented 3 months ago
Thank u and congratulations!! Well done!!
Gurprit Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months 3 weeks ago Commented 3 months ago
I have been smoking for 40 years and have quit before just to start again after few months. Now have decided to quit. I have set my quit date January 29. Any helpful suggestions will be appreciated
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 3 months ago
Gurprit, what I told myself over 3 years ago, and still tell myself today when I feel a little off is that there are millions of people who live day to day, without having to smoke cigarettes so why can't people like you and me be like them! You can do this and lean on the people in this forum if you need support!
Bseaton
Quitting in 2 days 1 hour posted 8 min 46 sec ago
5th time resetting quit date , but im sure its gonna be okay. I smoked near 2 packs today , out of nowhere. just a wild day of smoking. but no guilt felt. I will do my best tomorrow to be strong and no smoke, i need to be able to truly believe i can do this 💚

🚭🚭🚭
Lari
Quit 2 weeks ago posted 5 hours 12 min ago
I slipped and my new quilt date will be tomorrow morning . I felt supported periodically but I have found that it is not very effective quitting without actual physical support with people who are going through similar struggles. My plan is to call a coach this time. I have had 8 days quit last month and this time I had 11 days. I hope this time it will be for ever. I really want to stop and this time I went out for 3 days rather than 30 days
2 Comments last reply 2 hours ago
QuitCoach Elke Log in or register to post comments
Quit 30 years 2 months ago Commented 3 hours 45 min ago
Hi Lari, it is great that you are getting back right away to quitting! This forum is a great place for sharing and getting support. The more support the better it is. Excellent idea to connect with one of the coaches for support and strategies. You have already been smoke free twice for over a week, which is a good sign. And you sound very motivated with a great desire to quit and stay quit, which is excellent! So you already have lots of things going for you. Feel free to call 1877-455-2233 anytime to enroll in the program to get connected with a coach. Wishing you a successful quit!
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 2 hours 54 min ago
Lari, this whole thing is a process, complete with ups and downs. I’m glad you are working at it, and back in the saddle tomorrow. The quit coaches are amazing, and there are many here at different stages of their quit ready to cheer you on. Don’t be shy 🤗
di42scott@gmail.com
Quit 1 month 2 weeks ago posted 12 hours 46 min ago
Week one done, it was a tough week. Some days I should just smoke. I only smoked 2 cigarettes a day. At 82 it is just a chore. I will continue to be smoke free.



2 Comments last reply 2 hours ago
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 12 hours 11 min ago
Hi di42scott, thank you for sharing this part of your Quit Journey with our online community. Congratulations on achieving your week one of your quit! You are correct that it can somedays be an absolute chore to continue your attempt to live smoke-free. At any age. I hope you are incredibly proud of all your efforts, and commitment to the work you are doing to live the life you aspire to di42scott!
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 2 hours 52 min ago
I still have moments I think I should just smoke, and then I take a deep breath and remember what a wonderful thing it is to be free. Just keep gong one day at a time for now … before you know it, you will be at your first year 🤗. I think you are amazing doing this at 82!
cassandraneilson
Thinking about quitting posted 17 hours 39 min ago
This is hard to admit, but I have a serious problem with anger which is a trigger for me to smoke. The good news is that my quit is going strong and I have some good information I printed off the internet and some good plans written out that I prepared previously, I read these every night before going to bed because I sometimes get furious when I wake up at 1or 2 in the morning. It happened Sunday and when I became furious I kept telling myself to calm down and I focussed my attention on comforting my dog. When I get angry I yell a lot and with my previous dog my anger fits gave her PTSD for life which I have never forgiven myself for. With my current dog Daisy I'm determined not to give her PTSD. What I did Sunday worked not to act out and yell and slam cupboard doors, etc. and instead to tell myself to calm down and to comfort Daisy and not go out and buy cigarettes. I didn't realize that when you quit often other issues come up that need to be dealt with. I'm so glad I've quit and are having success dealing with related issues.
1 Comment last reply 16 hours ago
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 2 months ago Commented 16 hours 51 min ago
Hi Cassandra, thank you so much for sharing your quit experience and being open about the challenges you're facing. It's commendable that you're taking proactive steps to manage your anger and its connection to smoking. Quitting smoking can indeed bring up other issues that need to be addressed, and it sounds like you're navigating this journey with determination and self-awareness. Your commitment to not letting your anger affect your dog, Daisy, is truly admirable. It's great to hear that you have found strategies that work for you, like focusing on comforting Daisy and calming yourself down during moments of anger. Each time you successfully manage your triggers without resorting to smoking, you're strengthening your resolve and building resilience. Keep going strong and continue to lean on your support system, whether it's this forum, friends, or family, during challenging times. You're not alone in this journey, and we're here to support you every step of the way. Please continue with all the things that work for you, and keep celebrating each victory, no matter how small. Thank you, Cassandra, for sharing with us today and congratulations on all the hard work you’ve put into reaching your goals. You're doing fantastic! Keep up the excellent work!
QuitCoach Kristena
Quit 6 years ago posted 1 day 9 hours ago
As summer approaches, this can be a great opportunity to quit smoking!

Here are a few helpful tips for quitting in the summer:

1) Choose smoke free restaurants and bars
2) Bring your "Quit Kit" to BBQs and any summer events. The Quit Kit can consist of gum, sunflower seeds, candy or anything that takes your mind off smoking.
3) Don't let the fear of weight gain stop you from quitting. The truth is, if you eat healthy and exercise regularly, this will help prevent weight gain and improve your ability to manage cravings!
4) Engage in outdoor activities such as walking, biking, running, etc to help keep busy and enjoy the beautiful weather!
5) Embrace the lovely weather as you tell yourself "I want to breath in the fresh air" when a craving arises.

There is no better time to quit than the present. Call a Quit Coach today at 1-877-455-2233 to help you on your journey!
2 Comments last reply 8 hours ago
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months 1 week ago Commented 13 hours 9 min ago
I am happy to say I will have my first summer smoke free. Such a good feeling.
QuitCoach Emilie Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 8 hours 29 min ago
Hi MJ!! Enjoy your first summer smoke free! Take in all that beautiful smoke free air and keep up the amazing work!
Lucille Brown
Quit 8 years 1 month ago posted 2 days 3 hours ago
Find your niche in life and remember to stay strong and believe that you are capable of achieving anything you set your mind to. Your potential is such that success is not that far away. Remember that mistakes are made, however that's all they are, so never say never. The time will come when you'll look back and say, "Why Didn't I quit sooner?" So so proud of all of you for continuing your quit now journey. Listen to your conscience, do whatever you can to move forward because at the end of the day, it will be your gift of life and happiness and you'll never regret it. I know how hard it is but I can attest that's it's also well worth it.
1 Comment last reply 1 day ago
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 day 13 hours ago
Thank you for these wonderful words of encouragement, Lucille Brown! You are absolutely right- it is so important to believe in ourselves during the quit and that we will reach a point where we can get to the other side. Your journey is helping others find the strength to keep moving forward. Congratulations on being smoke free for over 8 years now; what an incredible journey it has been!
Mlittle
Quitting in 1 week posted 2 days 14 hours ago
Day two of quitting

So far feeling confident and strong about my choice minimal cravings been snacking a whole lot tho
2 Comments last reply 2 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 2 days 13 hours ago
Stay strong and focussed Mlittle 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 and don’t worry about the snack thing right now. You are doing what you can to not smoke and I am super proud of you!
QuitCoach Elke Log in or register to post comments
Quit 30 years 2 months ago Commented 2 days 10 hours ago
Congratulations on day 2 being smoke free Mlittle! Liz is absolutely right, keep up that confidence and commitment to your quit. Cravings will pass usually after a couple of minutes. You might try the 4 D's (delay, distract, drinking water and deep breathing) to help you get through them. You can also access free Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) products such as the NRT patch, NRT gum and NRT lozenges through your local pharmacy for free with your Medical Service Plan Card.
The increased appetite is a common withdrawal symptom, having multiple healthy snacks throughout the day can help to boost your energy and prevent cravings for foods that are higher in fat and sugar. Some healthy snack ideas are carrots, celery, peppers with hummus, low fat yoghurt or cottage cheese and fruits (all types of berries, apples etc) as well as whole grain crackers, popcorn and nuts. Physical activity can also help to burn some of the extra calories and contribute to feeling better. Wishing you continuous success with your quit!
Salmogirl67
Quit 1 month ago posted 2 days 20 hours ago
I am a 57 year old female who started smoking when I was 10 years old. To be honest by the time I was 13 I was smoking a pack a day (20 cigarettes).

I have tried to quit a couple of times through out my life with zero success, always finding an excuse to keep smoking. I have now had to make a choice to not quit and forfeit my neck surgery and continue living with chronic pain and migraines or give up my nasty habit and have my live altering surgery.

I of course choose the surgery. My loving husband has started this journey with me and it has been not as tough as we thought it would be, so far. I will be have to rest from my surgery for about 4-6 weeks after my surgery and then embark on a lot of physiotherapy after my surgery so this will help with keeping my mind and body active, which in turn will keep me smoke free.

I just wanted to share my journey so far and to say Congratulations and good luck to everyone else deciding to embark on the same journey.
2 Comments last reply 2 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 2 days 13 hours ago
👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 congrats to you and your hubby Salmogirl67 🤗
QuitCoach Elke Log in or register to post comments
Quit 30 years 2 months ago Commented 2 days 10 hours ago
Welcome to the forum Salmogirl67 and thank you for sharing your journey. Congratulations on being smoke free for a month, an important milestone to celebrate! It is truly inspiring how you have been able to succeed even after smoking heavily at such a young age and for such a long time. Kudos to you for persisting and choosing your health over the addiction. You are a wonderful example that it is never to late to quit and that it is possible to quit when you put your mind to it! All the best for your surgery and your smoke free life! Please keep us updated.
greggs007
Quitting in 1 month posted 3 days 8 hours ago
Last time, I have COPD, emphazima
3 Comments last reply 3 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 3 days 3 hours ago
Welcome greggs007. I am so sorry that you developed some illnesses from smoking, but hopefully once you quit, your body can start getting busy repairing itself. I believe in healing, and I believe you can finally say goodbye to smoking when you are ready!
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 2 months ago Commented 3 days 3 hours ago
Hi greggs007, welcome to QuitNow community and congratulations on your decision to quit smoking! We are so glad you’re here! Taking this important step towards a smoke-free life is truly admirable. We are sorry to hear that you face some health challenges and are dealing with COPD and emphysema. You have powerful motivators and quitting smoking can have a positive impact on managing these conditions and improving your overall health and well-being. As you prepare to start your quit journey, please know that you're not alone. This community is here to offer support and encouragement every step of the way. Please feel free to share your experiences, ask questions, or seek advice whenever you need it. We are here for you. You may also check this link for more information on getting ready for your quit day: https://quitnow.ca/how-quit/thinking-about-quitting/getting-ready-quit-day You may also consider reaching out to healthcare professionals for guidance and support tailored to your specific needs. They can provide valuable resources and strategies to help you succeed in achieving your goal of being smoke-free. Thank you for joining us today and wishing you all the best on your upcoming quit journey!
Bseaton Log in or register to post comments
Quitting in 2 days 1 hour Commented 3 days 2 hours ago
All the best for your quit! you will get to that smoke-free state and enjoy all of its benefits. Take it easy and for me as well this is the last time. 🪻
Quit Coach Linda
Quit 9 years 2 months ago posted 4 days 8 hours ago
Visualization is a powerful tool that can be used to support your efforts in quitting smoking. By visualizing your goals and the positive changes you want to achieve, you can strengthen your motivation, focus, and determination to stay smoke-free.

How to visualize:

Set clear goals: Start by setting clear and specific goals for your quit journey. Visualize yourself as being smoke-free, enjoying a healthier lifestyle, and experiencing the benefits of being tobacco-free.

Create a mental image: Close your eyes and create a vivid mental image of yourself as smoke-free. Imagine the activities you'll enjoy, the improved health you'll experience, and the freedom from the constraints of smoking.

Engage all your senses: Make your visualization as realistic as possible by engaging all your senses. Imagine the smell of fresh air, the taste of food becoming more vibrant, the sound of your improved breathing, and the feeling of increased energy and vitality.

Practice regularly: Each day, dedicate time to practice visualization. Find a quiet and comfortable place where you can focus without distractions. The more you practice, the more natural and effective your visualization will become.

Benefits of using visualization:

Enhanced motivation: Visualization can boost your motivation by providing a clear and compelling picture of the benefits of quitting smoking. It can serve as a constant reminder of why you chose to quit and the positive changes you're working towards.

Stress reduction: Visualizing calming and peaceful scenes can help reduce stress and anxiety, which are common triggers for smoking. By replacing negative thoughts with positive imagery, you can manage cravings more effectively.

Improved focus: Visualization can enhance your focus and concentration on your quit smoking goals. It can help you stay on track, remain committed to your decision, and resist the temptation to smoke.

Positive mindset: Adopting a positive mindset through visualization can improve your overall outlook and resilience on your quit smoking journey. It can instill confidence in your ability to overcome challenges and achieve success.

Enhanced self-efficacy: Visualization can increase your belief in your ability to quit smoking successfully. By visualizing yourself as smoke-free and experiencing the benefits firsthand, you can build self-efficacy and confidence in your quit journey.

In conclusion, visualization is a valuable technique that can support and enhance your efforts to quit smoking. By incorporating visualization into your daily routine, you can reinforce your commitment, manage stress, and stay focused on your path to a healthier, smoke-free life.
Bsl
Quit 6 years ago posted 4 days 14 hours ago
Well 6yrs smoke free! It has gone by fast. Life is so much better. I think one of the best things about not smoking is how much extra money I have. When I was smoking, I lived pay cheque to pay cheque, now I have leftovers I can transfer to a savings account. The health benefits are awesome as well, and I don’t stink.
5 Comments last reply 2 days ago
DianneE Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 years 6 months ago Commented 4 days 13 hours ago
Way to go BSL! And what I find is one of the best things about quitting is I'm not constantly craving a cigarette! For some reason I thought I would be dealing with some level of cravings all my life, but have simply found that not to be the case. I don't miss smoking at all! Fantastic milestone Bsl!
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 4 days 13 hours ago
Hi Bsl, thank you for sharing this reflection on your own personal Quit Journey with us on the QuitNow community forum. Congratulations on your 6 year anniversary of living a smoke-free life! That is an amazing triumph to achieve. I am so glad you have realized a life that has yielded so many benefits to both your health, and your bank account. Both are very true. Thank you for your honesty and providing motivation and inspiration to other community members that share your goal and can see that future for themselves. I wish you all the best in continuing to live your best smoke-free life Bsl, and I hope you celebrate your accomplishment today!
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 4 days 13 hours ago
Hi DianneE, thank you as well for sharing part of your triumphs along your Quit Journey with our community forum. It is wonderful to hear members share successes and reflections on how they have overcome some of the challenges that come from withdrawal symptoms, and cravings. You are right when you realize the cravings don't last forever, they may still come at fleeting moments over time; however as you move through the quit journey they tend to become less frequent and less intense. Congratulations to you as well on a very successful 5 year, and 6 month quit. Thank you for supporting the QuitNow members, and I wish you all the continued success in your journey as well DianneE!
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months 1 week ago Commented 3 days 12 hours ago
Congratulations! You are a role model for so many of us!
Lucille Brown Log in or register to post comments
Quit 8 years 1 month ago Commented 2 days 3 hours ago
Bsl, huge congratulations on reaching your 6 year quitversary. Knew you had it in you and all your hard work really paid off. Way to go and high fives all around. Hugs and continued success. Lucille.
cassandraneilson
Thinking about quitting posted 5 days 9 hours ago
Just an update today. I haven't gone out at 4 in the morning to buy cigarettes during my quit since Sunday. I'm sleeping better and not waking up so early. I do find, however, that I have strong cravings in the morning when I do get up and these days I'm floored by fatigue. I know from Quit Coaches comments that fatigue is a withdrawal symptom and it will pass eventually. This quitting is hard business, but rewarding.
1 Comment last reply 5 days ago
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 5 days 8 hours ago
Hi cassandraneilson, thank you for sharing your success in your Quit Journey! Congratulations on successfully overcoming your trigger of early morning cravings. That is an amazing accomplishment in your journey. I am happy to hear that you have gained insight into your triggers and are using some of the strategies and information you have learned along the way to become successful in managing this trigger. Quitting is hard work cassandraneilson, and you are doing it! Your commitment will lead you to the smoke-free life you want and so deserve.
iram
Quitting today posted 5 days 12 hours ago
I have smoked off and on my whole life and before my separation I quit for two years straight and had no cravings. I am smoking again now due to stress from the court processes and find it hard to cope without smoking.
3 Comments last reply 5 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 5 days 10 hours ago
Hi Iram 😊 I think everyone here can relate to using smoking as a stress reliever. Be kind to yourself and maybe give one of the quit coaches a call to see if you can put a quit plan together. This isn’t a race. It’s important you feel confident and supported when you decide to give it a go again. The beauty is if you fall, you dust yourself off and get back on the horse again. I look forward to seeing you win this battle!
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 5 days 10 hours ago
Hi iram, thank you for sharing this part of you Quit Journey with our QuitNow online community forum. Congratulations on establishing a quit date for yourself, that is a great step to take in your preparation to meet your goal to live a smoke-free life iram. I hope you are able to use all the wonderful information and strategies you learned from your previous quit attempt and apply them to this quit. It is a good thing to be insightful of our triggers as that is how we can plan relapse prevention strategies to learn how to cope differently. The 4D's are an excellent place to start when you are coping with cravings throughout your quit journey. The 4D's are Delay, Drink Water (a straw can also assist with the hand to mouth, and oral fixation), Deep breathing, and Distraction. If you would like to engage in behavioral counseling to assist you in your attempt to become smoke-free please reach out to 1-877-455-2233. Any of our quit coaches would be honored to assist you in meeting your goal to live the smoke-free life you want to live iram. All the best to you in your journey!
cassandraneilson Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 5 days 9 hours ago
Don't despair iram. Your smoking to deal with stress is completely normal. I think you'll find as I have that once you get on a roll with quitting you deal with stress drastically more effectively. You have a lot to look forward to when you quit. Hang in there!
jennydls
Quit 3 months 1 week ago posted 5 days 16 hours ago
Its now been 3 months since I quit. I have to say it hasn't been an easy journey. I have good days and of course the bad ones. Lately for some reason I cant stop thinking about smoking and its driving me crazy. Honestly I couldn't imagine smoking again, The smell and the taste.......yuck! And I don't want to stink like smoke ever again.
Hope everyone has a great smoke free day!
6 Comments last reply 5 days ago
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 5 days 16 hours ago
Congratulations jennydls on being smoke free for three months! That is an incredible accomplishment and we are all so proud of you. It can be common to have cravings around the three month mark as that is typically when we may tend to forget or minimize the reasons why we quit in the first place but remember that is the addiction talking. Relapse is most common in the third month but you are staying strong! The fact that you are able to recognize the cravings are there but remind yourself of the negative symptoms associated with smoking is huge. You are showing the addiction who is in control! Keep pushing through it will get easier, we are all here for you!
cassandraneilson Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 5 days 15 hours ago
Hi jennydls, it sure is tough this quitting smoking. I admire you because you have quit for 3 months. - way to go, I too think about smoking a lot even though I don't ever want to go back to yukky smoking, Hang in there and be strong. You can do it!
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months 1 week ago Commented 5 days 15 hours ago
I am also at the 3 month part. I think this is a trigger point from what I've read, with the next one being 3 years. I also think about smoking as I really enjoyed it. LOL. It's just not good for you. I don't think of it as this nasty thing except that once on it you can't easily get off of it and it has the worst health implications for many later in life. That is what keeps me off it but I most certainly think about it still as well.
Stanley Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 12 months ago Commented 5 days 14 hours ago
Hi Jenny,

That is the craving to urge you to have a puff, so don't let it break your smoke-free journey. In my experience, it took me almost 6 and half months to let go the craving, it was completely gone. My mind don't think of smoking anymore and no urge.

Cheer you up and KEEP NOPE

Stand firm to say No to nicodemon
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months 1 week ago Commented 5 days 10 hours ago
That's very helpful Stanley, thank you! 6 months! wow. What an addiction it is.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 5 days 10 hours ago
Yay jennydls 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 three months is an amazing milestone, and even though the thoughts still come, you have some time under your belt now to make it through them. The first year for me, was probably the most challenging … everything was a first. After that, you will be a pro lol! Celebrate the win 🎉🎉🎉