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Lari
Quit 1 week 4 days ago posted 6 days 15 hours ago
I’ve stopped smoking on April 7th. Late evening This is multiple attempts to stop in the last few years. I am determined that this will be the last time! Cravings come and go and the suggestions from the quit now team via text and email and others that have become non smokers remind me that these will lessen over time until they are gone. There is something I can do. Like deep breathing, water, exercise or something else to distract myself.
3 Comments last reply 6 days ago
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 6 days 15 hours ago
Hi Lari, thank you for sharing this part of your quit journey with our QuitNow online community. Congratulations on achieving living your smoke-free life for 5 days now!! I love that you have declared your commitment to your quit and are determined to overcome your cravings and sustain your life as a Non-Smoker!!! You can use the experience you acquired through your previous attempts to assist you in your continued success on your journey. You are very insightful to identify what your triggers are and using the 4D's to overcome your cravings. I wish you all the best in your new smoke-free life Lari.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 6 days 13 hours ago
You can do this Lari! One craving at a time is all you need to get through right now. You are on the way to your first week 🎉🎉🎉🎉.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 6 days 7 hours ago
Wishing you the strength to handle the jandal when craves try taking over. Remember NOPE ODAAT IWNSWYT have faith in your self, talk yourself down from the smoke thinking. Don't react to the pain caused by craves. It will pass if you keep going strong in the mind.
Peaceful calming breaths and meditation keeps your mind strong. Pray or talk to God all around us. He is in control of the world. He can help as it may take a miracle to conquer this disease we have.
di42scott@gmail.com
Quit 1 month 1 week ago posted 1 week 1 day ago
Well I have relapsed. I plan to try again on April 14th. I am very disappointed in myself after doing 15 days smoke free. My triggers seem to be when I’m alone and feeling sorry for myself. I live alone and sometimes it just seems like to much. Any words of wisdom would be helpful.
9 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Grandma@K-A-D Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months 3 weeks ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
I wish I had some wisdom to share but sadly my issue is the same as yours. Feeling lonely and sometimes sad drives me to slip or relapse.
All we can do is keep trying, don't be too hard on yourself 15 days is a great accomplishment!
We have to remember we are not alone in this journey which is sometimes easier said than done.
Bseaton Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Live on my own as well and trying to find solace without smoking. Tricky stuff. 15 days though that is some great momentum! I wish you grace and ease for the coming days. Ya, I feel you guys here💚

Keep goin.
QuitCoach Emilie Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 1 week ago
Hi di42Scott,

Please don't beat yourself up about this slip. It happens to the best of us. All that you need to focus on is how to move forward and keep doing amazing work. Getting to 15 days truly is AMAZING work! If being alone is a trigger could you possibly look at finding a hobby that may get you out of the house, like a local gym or club? Sometimes this is also used as an amazing form of distraction! You are not alone in this journey so feel free to reach out to us here anytime. We are all here cheering you on and know your capable of amazing things! Keep it up!
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months ago Commented 1 week ago
Sorry to hear but look at it like a slip up and that is all. You did 15 days and that makes you a nonsmoker, you just have to get back on it and do it again. I had this happen more than once but I kept trying and eventually decided on this last attempt that I was no longer willing to endure withdrawal yet again and that has stuck for me (almost 3 months now). No matter what nicotine is not a good friend to have. I live alone also but I joined a gym and go to it 5 days a week every morning. Lots of people around and that made me feel not alone. I think it is the gym that has saved me from starting again to be honest because when a craving got so bad I'd put my runners on and head out to the gym. Great distraction and exercise hits the brain quickly so you feel like you got a 'fix' and then my craving would be gone. I do this now first thing in the morning to start the day off but if I ever get a strong craving and can't cope I'll head to the gym for a bit to get rid of it. Backup plans are kind of needed when you quit.
Lucille Brown Log in or register to post comments
Quit 8 years 1 month ago Commented 1 week ago
Never be hard on yourself, it takes time and your day will come when you least expect it. There is no failure here and knowing you're still willing to try will bring success soon. Your hard work will always pay off. Just remember you're not alone and think of it as a precursor to a wonderful smoke free life. I guarantee it will happen soon. You're building up your strength and learning along the way. Good on you. Hugs, Lucille.
Stanley Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 11 months ago Commented 1 week ago
HI Di42Scott,

Don't blame yourself. Try to get back the horse and start again. you are already 15 days smoke-free. So it is easy to go back to smoke-free. it is a slip only. When I recalled my quit I had a slip as well. but I stopped myself and throw the cigarette away immediately.

My method is to do exercises such as running, I run every day during my quit at the beginning I only run 2-3 km. But now 10 km is an easy run.

Don't give up.

Cheer you up and KEEP NOPE

Stand firm to say No nicodemon
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week ago
You have an army of people here rallying around you right now Di42Scott 🤗. There is no shame in the process of quitting! I also spent many hours by myself and found it difficult when I first started my quit. It sucks … no mincing words … but I have no doubt you will figure out how to get past this hurdle. Silence and stillness is a huge gift for me now and I hope you will see the beauty in that one day soon too! 🤗
DianneE Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 years 6 months ago Commented 1 week ago
Di42Scott,
You are not alone as long as you're on this forum! I'm like some of the others, single, and on my own. I found my worst times were late at night, I can't count the number of times I was going to hop in a cab and buy a package of cigarettes, but I never did. I knew that I had one crack at quitting because I was pretty certain I would not have the strength to do it again. So what I did was either come on the forum and post how I was feeling, or looked up how the tobacco industry "got us". Being pissed off at the tobacco industry really helped me with my cravings. Don't give up. It may take a few attempts, but if you want it bad enough, you can do it!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 6 days 7 hours ago
I hope you don't continue to smoke for a long time. Hope you get right back on the quit bus. But here's the thing the longer you quit the longer you recover enough to have some health issues sorted. So you have done a lot of good for yourself after 15 days. Hopefully you notice the difference a quit has made for you and you return to the quit and take it one day at a time. Try beat your 15 days.
Lucille Brown
Quit 8 years 1 month ago posted 1 week 1 day ago
Dear Era, I'm so sorry that you are leaving the forum. I will keep my opinions to myself, however I still want to wish you well in your endeavours to quit. I only hope that we have been some help to you in the past. Just remember that you're never alone, you'll have good days and bad days but I'm sure you'll handle them the best way you know how. Take care and stay healthy and happy. You've come a long way and you should be extremely proud of yourself as I am of you. Good luck dear friend and if by chance you wish to drop us a line every now and again please do so. Hugs and all the best, Lucille.
6 Comments last reply 1 week ago
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Hi Lucille Brown, thank you for showing your continued support for all members of our QuitNow community. We are so grateful to have you a part of our forum and your motivational words never go unnoticed. Thank you for being so kind and supportive of everyone's journeys!
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Hi Lucille, I know your post is directed toward the friend you made in Era. She was a wonderful support to our QuitNow online community. You are a testament to just that. I am also so proud that you are a continued support to our community as well. The check-ins you provide on your own successful quit journey is so inspirational to other and serve as motivation for your peers to continue on their own journey's as well. Congratulations to you Lucille on living smoke-free for over 8 years now. I wish you many happy, healthy smoke-free days ahead.
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 2 months ago Commented 1 week ago
Thank you Lucille and Quit Coaches...it seems Liz is busy living her action-packed smoke free life. So very, very, very, very, very busy. Much too busy to come on here to say a quick farewell. Well, bless her heart. Goodbye, now Liz!
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week ago
Oh era, I am never too busy for you. This was Lucille’s post to you, and I did not want to interfere. I don’t want to see you go either and sadly, have no way to send notes privately, and would hope you would consider staying on. Our old group has dwindled, and we still need each other to support and be supported by. I have always been very very proud of you!
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 2 months ago Commented 1 week ago
I'm sorry Liz, I was being sarcastic and I'm ashamed of myself.

I felt disappointment because I hadn't heard from you. It got me thinking that the connection we formed online might not be as deep as I initially thought.

Losing an online friend feels as bad as the death of 'real life' one.

Private messaging is the answer and would clear up any misunderstandings. If only this site offered that option.

May you find comfort and peace in your heart and soul, as you continue your journey.🌹
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week ago
I am sorry I didn’t chime in sooner. You have a great heart and there is nothing you can do to lose me as a friend 💐
QuitCoach Kristena
Quit 6 years ago posted 1 week 1 day ago
You are in control!

Show your cravings that you are in control by changing your perception of them. Let's embrace our cravings (this might sound a little silly)! When we embrace our cravings and use them as an opportunity to show ourselves we are strong and capable, we are taking the power away from the cravings. The cravings are giving us a chance to move closer to a smoke free life by allowing us the opportunity to conquer them. The amount of resilience and strength we gain through conquering each and every craving is HUGE! You can tell the craving "I feel you and I will conquer you" or "This craving is just another sign my body is healing."

Next time you get a craving, welcome it! Don't be scared of the cravings, use them as a chance to gain more strength and control in your quit journey.
3 Comments last reply 1 week ago
Bseaton Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
this one is really helpful. im on my side not against myself :) and ill be honest the strength of those cravings can be a little scary feeling sometimes they make my feel like things will get worse if i dont puff. so sad. but this is great to have in the toolkit
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Hi Bseaton, you are absolutely on your side not against yourself! I know it can be extremely hard, especially when those powerful cravings come, but you are stronger than them! I believe in you! Remind yourself of all the hardships you have overcome in your life to get to this point, you can and you will conquer those cravings. I know you are stronger than them, believe in yourself!
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
if you are getting a craving it means deeper healing is taking place in the body!
TerryTeo
Quit 1 month 1 week ago posted 1 week 2 days ago
Is vaping okay or just as bad as smokes. I am finding that it is getting harder and harder to cut off everything. I was using gum but that gets horrible to taste like an ashtray. I don't know why I vape because I don't like it but when I have nothing for a while I will crave it. Then I have it and it doesn't satisfy like a smoke does. Then a smoke gets yuck and back to the vape. Endless cycle of abuse but the minute I get a symptom of poor health I will naturally fight for my life. It's a reflex action I've had since birth. Then I have enablers next door who want me to buy meth for everyone. I will be very rich this week when I continue this quit til next week and beyond. The eclipse has aligned for a miracle quit. Hope everyone has their quit under control???
2 Comments last reply 1 week ago
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Hi TerryTeo, there is currently limited research on the implications of vaping but it can elicit some of the same negative effects as smoking a cigarette. I understand that you are stuck in an endless cycle right now and I appreciate your honesty. Keep pushing forward! I promise you it will get easier. Perhaps try to find something that can mimic the hand to mouth motion of the vape and cigarettes. Some examples could be to fake smoke with a straw, pretzel sticks, water bottle, etc. This can help when your body is craving a smoke while also using an NRT gum to lesson the intensity of the craving. Keep reminding yourself of why you started this journey. You can do this!!
Bseaton Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
i know what its like to bounce between the two and really not wanting to do either lol it sucks. my quit is going okay but still hard to cut off everything as well. cant seem to get to the point where i dont pick anything up. thanks for sharing
Lucille Brown
Quit 8 years 1 month ago posted 1 week 2 days ago
First and foremost congratulations Green Meenie on your seven quit anniversary. Sorry I'm so late. Certain problems have prevented me from keeping in touch as I would have liked, I won't go into details, but I know how hard everyone worked to keep up with their quits and I try to read posts from new and old quitters alike. I just want to let you know that no matter how difficult things can be, a cigarette isn't your go to, to feel better. Still smoke free even with all the worries and difficulties ahead of me. Please accept that no one is perfect, it takes time and effort to get through a quit. Do what you can to stay healthy and believe that one day your time will come when that horrid nicodemon will no longer have a hold on you. Congratulations to my fellow peers whom I have come to know over the years, Green Meenie, Stanley, Era, C by the Sea, Liz, Greg, Paddleboy, Ptoudaz and the list goes on, you know who you are. I miss you and wish you all the best. There is no better forum than this one and the Quit coaches are wonderful. Let them guide you and treat each other as family as that's where you'll find all the support you need. Take care all and hugs being sent your way. I'll try to keep in touch more often, however please don't worry, I'm O.K.
7 Comments last reply 1 week ago
Stanley Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 years 11 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Hi Lucille,

wish you well too. Glad to see your post again. I almost reached third years line.
We miss you too, please take care.

Cheer you up and KEEP NOPE

Stand firm to say No to nicodemon
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
H Lucille. I am so grateful to have had you guide me through my journey. I pray all is ok … you are a shining star to all of us ❤️
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Thank you so much Lucille Brown for sharing your encouraging and kind words with us all! We are so proud of how far you have come and how you are using your experience and journey to help others along the way. You are a pillar of support for so many and we are incredibly grateful to have you a part of our QuitNow community! Keep up the amazing work and the wisdom you are sharing with us all. Everyone is on their own journey but to be able to have so many amazing role models like yourself to look up to can help tremendously. Thank you thank you thank you!! I hope you are celebrating the incredible milestone you have reached and giving yourself some self-care a long the way!
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 2 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
I know that my above post will be taken down - doesn't meet the forum guidelines.

However, I'd like to point out that I didn't name names, nor did I retaliate.

Evidence that I'm adept at being the bigger person.
Green Meenie Log in or register to post comments
Quit 7 years 2 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Nice to hear from you Lucille! I too don't come here as often as I once did; or should, but all you said about quitting is true. Thanks for the reminders!
I hope things are better for you now than they were awhile ago.

These quit smoking sites need the input from those of us who've quit long term!

Take care & be well!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
No! Is a full sentence.
NOPE ODAAT IWNSWYT
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
"no matter how difficult things can be, a cigarette isn't your go to" . I love hearing these things from those who are many years smoke free. It's a difficult habit and I will not cave now that I am free but I do think about it so when I hear those words from those who are long time nonsmokers it helps me so much so thank you!
cassandraneilson
Thinking about quitting posted 1 week 3 days ago
Hi fellow forum people and Quit Coaches. I needed to post again today because I'm having a hard time with withdrawal sypmtoms. It' 3am, I woke at 130 am. This happens every night. I've had alot of nausea since quitting. I learned acetominophen interacts with the patch and gives you severe nausea. That I think is why I had bad nausea yesterday. The good news today is that I'm only getting cravings in the morning which last about 20 minutes and which I ignore. The way I feel now is that I've never going back on cigarettes and I will ride out the withdrawal symptoms no matter what. It's hard, but I feel I can do it. How is everybody else doing these days? I really enjoy. people's posts and being kept up to date on how people are feeling.
4 Comments last reply 1 week ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Hi Cassandra. I am really proud of you right now! You are recognizing that the discomfort you are feeling right now is super yucky at the moment, but they do eventually go away. This is your body’s healing experience. Mine felt like my skin was crawling! Even though my time in is a bit longer than yours, I remember my quit experience like it was yesterday. It was the toughest thing I have ever had to do in my life, letting go of smoking. I feel like you are at this moment too. It may feel like an eternity of misery some days, and those days I spent crying and taking baths and pacing and laying down with my eyes closed and whatever I could do to ride it out. You need to do this work to get to the other side. We all have to do it. Keep up staying present with what is going on in your body, thank you body for being strong while it rids the nicotine from your system and give thanks for the strength to get through your moments of discomfort one at a time. I will be thinking of you today and sending some virtual strength your way 🤗💐
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 2 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Hi Cassandra, we are sorry to hear that you’re having a hard time with withdrawal symptoms. Please hang in there. Dealing with withdrawal symptoms can be challenging, especially when they disrupt your sleep patterns. This physical and mental discomfort is temporary and will gradually improve over time as your body is healing and adjusting to being smoke-free. It's inspiring to see your determination to persevere through these challenges and stay tobacco-free. Keep going strong. You've already come so far, and with your determination and resilience, you'll continue to progress on your quit journey. Regarding the nausea you've been experiencing, it's great that you've identified a potential trigger and are taking steps to address it. Being mindful of how certain medications or substances interact with your quit journey can help you manage your symptoms more effectively. If you have questions or concerns about nausea, please talk to a healthcare professional. We’re glad to hear that you're finding ways to manage your cravings and remain committed to staying smoke-free, despite the difficulties you're facing. Please continue to be patient with yourself and to practice self-care during this transition time. You are doing amazing and we're incredibly proud of your progress, Cassandra. Thank you for sharing your experience with us. Keep moving forward and know that each day without cigarettes is a victory worth celebrating. Together, we can navigate through the ups and downs of quitting smoking and emerge stronger and healthier on the other side. Take care.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Aww so sad when the nightmare of no smoking wakes you up and craving too. Probably the hardest crave you can face. I never made it til I did the hard yards. Your body is out of balance and needs a lot of TLC and elbow grease. Keep up the hard work and you will find it's worth it to beat this disease. Cold turkey might help you sleep the patch is not needed when sleeping. Try not to overdo the NRT there's cues to recognize when you may need some nicotine replacement and some cues you have to ignore like the plague. Like even thinking about smoking can trigger cues in your body. Melatonin may help deep sleep. You have a deficit in sleep and so a hot chocolate will help give you rest to heal. Right now you're on edge which is no good. Google all you need to sleep.
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Cassandra take magnesium bisglycenate and melatonin for sleeping. You are probably deficient in magnesium to start. Ginger is good for nausea
Feiton_wilson
Quitting in 3 weeks posted 1 week 3 days ago
I started vaping extremely young, I'm not proud of it but after a year I wasn't able to put it down anymore, I used to be able to stop whenever I wanted for how ever long I wanted but now I can't go more then 5 minutes without vaping, I want to stop but I can't find time to
3 Comments last reply 1 week ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Hi Feiton_wilson 🤗. You are not a bad person for vaping at a young age … my first puff of a cigarette was at age 6! I know exactly how you feel. The beauty is that you are here now, and this program can offer some great tools to help you let go of the habit, and support you through your quit experience. Time will be one of the great gifts you will receive when you are able to give vaping up! If you haven’t already and feel comfortable doing so, maybe connect with a quit coach and they can help you make a plan to start the process of letting go. It can be your first real step to freedom 😊. I am glad you are here!
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 2 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Hi Feiton_wilson, welcome to QuitNow community and congratulations on your decision to quit vaping! We are so glad you’re here and thank you for sharing your story with us. It's commendable that you've recognized the challenges you're facing with vaping and that you're motivated to make a change. Please know you're not alone in this journey and we're here to support you every step of the way. Do not hesitate to contact us anytime. You may also consider reaching out to a healthcare professional for guidance and support tailored to your needs. They can provide you with resources and strategies to help you gradually reduce your dependence on vaping. Having a supportive network can provide encouragement and accountability on your quit journey. Quitting vaping is a process, and it's okay to seek help along the way. You have already taken the first step by acknowledging your desire to stop, and that's a significant achievement in itself. Way to go! Finding time to address your vaping habit amidst your daily responsibilities can indeed be difficult, but taking small steps towards quitting can make a big difference. Consider starting small by setting achievable goals. Whether it's gradually reducing your vaping frequency or setting aside specific times of the day when you won't vape, taking small steps can lead to significant progress over time. Here's a link for some information about quitting vaping: https://quitnow.ca/how-quit/ready-quit/tips-quit-vaping Stay determined, Feiton. You have the strength and what it takes to overcome this challenge, and we're here to cheer you on every step of the way. You can do this!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Maybe try lower the nicotine levels til zero Nic. It's the nicotine that you are withdrawaling from
Quit Coach Linda
Quit 9 years 2 months ago posted 1 week 3 days ago
How to manage strong emotions after quitting smoking? Dealing with intense emotions can be challenging as nicotine withdrawal symptoms and the absence of cigarettes can exacerbate feelings of stress, anxiety, irritability, and sadness. However, there are several strategies that can help you cope with these emotions effectively:

Recognize and accept strong emotions. Understand that experiencing these intense emotions after quitting smoking is normal and temporary. Acknowledge your feelings without judgment or self-criticism.

Practice deep breathing. These breathing exercises can help you calm the nervous system and reduce feelings of anxiety or agitation. Take slow, deep breaths, inhaling through your nose and exhaling through your mouth.

Engage in physical activity to help relieve stress, improve mood, and distract from nicotine cravings. Practice activities that you enjoy, such as walking, running, yoga, or dancing.

Find healthy ways to express your emotions, such as talking to a supportive friend or family member, writing in a journal, or engaging in creative activities like painting or music.

Practice mindfulness techniques or meditation to increase awareness of your thoughts and feelings in the present moment. Mindfulness can help you observe emotions without reacting impulsively.

Seek support from friends, family, or support groups to encourage and assist you during difficult times. Sharing your experiences with others can provide valuable emotional support.

Find healthy distractions and engage in activities that divert your attention from cravings or negative emotions. This could include reading, listening to music, watching movies, or pursuing hobbies.

Create a daily routine that includes regular meals, exercise, relaxation, and sleep. Structure and predictability can help stabilize emotions and reduce stress.

Take care of your physical and emotional well-being by getting enough rest, eating nutritious foods, staying hydrated, and engaging in activities that bring you joy and relaxation.

Quitting smoking is a significant life change, and it's normal to experience ups and downs along the way. Be patient with yourself, celebrate your progress, and remember that each day without smoking is an achievement worth celebrating.

By implementing these strategies and remaining committed to your quit journey, you can effectively manage strong emotions and navigate the challenges of quitting smoking with resilience and determination.
2 Comments last reply 1 week ago
Bseaton Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month ago Commented 1 week 3 days ago
The absence of them causes lots of turmoil in me, thanks for the tips to manage this.
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 2 months ago Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Hi Bseaton, thank you so much for sharing with us today and congratulations on your wonderful decision to quit smoking! We're so glad to hear that you found these tips helpful for managing strong emotions after quitting smoking. Quitting can indeed stir up a range of emotions and it's completely normal to experience ups and downs as your body and mind adjust to being without nicotine. If you ever feel overwhelmed by your cravings or emotions, don't hesitate to reach out for support. Whether it's talking to a friend, seeking advice from healthcare providers, or finding healthy distractions to keep your mind occupied, please know that there are many resources available to help you stay on track. You may also contact us anytime. We're here to offer encouragement and support every step of the way. Keep going strong. You've got this!
cassandraneilson
Thinking about quitting posted 1 week 3 days ago
Good morning everyone. I have great news. I'm making another quit attempt - my third attempt. I discovered on the weekend that some research has been done that found people with the devastating illness I've suffered from since 18 years old - Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - is helped and even cured by using nicotine patches. That is amazing since only 5% of sufferers ever recover from the disease. So, I went to my pharmacy yesterday and got some 7mg patches and started treatment with them. The added bonus is that it helps with cravings when quitting smoking so I've quit smoking. I've been afraid to post that I'm quitting because I'm worried about taking people on the emotional roller coaster that quitting is for me. I so don't want to disappoint people who support me. I'm afraid that it will be like the last time I quit where I was on the forum at 4 am sending out an sos and people responded and posted wonderful comments and I went out to 7 /11 and bought cigarettes anyways. My Chronic Fatigue Syndrome contributes to smoking because nicotine is a stimulant and it helps with symptoms like brain fog and exhaustion and pain so going on the patch is a double whammy helping with symptoms and helping with cravings. I had no cravings yesterday and this morning I don't really have cravings, but psychologically I'm missing the chain smoking that I usually do in the early morning. Thanks to my fellow forum people and Quit Coaches who have got me to this very hopeful point. I will post again in a couple days to update you with my quit journey. Let's all be strong.
3 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 2 months ago Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Good morning, Cassandra. Your determination and courage to embark on another quit attempt are truly commendable. Congratulations on your decision to quit again! It's wonderful to hear that you've found a potential solution that not only addresses your chronic fatigue syndrome but also supports your journey to quit smoking. We are so glad to hear that you’ve got a helpful tool to use. Discovering the potential benefits of nicotine patches for managing your chronic fatigue syndrome is indeed remarkable. You're taking proactive steps towards improving your health and well-being, and that's something to be celebrated. We understand that quitting smoking can be an emotional roller coaster, especially considering the challenges you've faced in the past. Please know that this community is here to support you and assist you in any way possible, regardless of the ups and downs along the way. Your willingness to share your journey with us demonstrates your strength and commitment to making positive changes in your life. It's understandable to miss the familiar routine of chain smoking in the early morning, but as you continue on your quit journey, you'll discover new habits and coping mechanisms that will bring you fulfillment and satisfaction without the need for cigarettes. You’ve got this! Thank you so much, Cassandra, for sharing with us today and please keep us updated on your amazing journey. Together, we can all be strong and support each other towards a smoke-free future.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Great job Cassandra. 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 one day at a time is all we can do … I’m glad the patches are helping you! They did for me too! 🤗
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 6 days 7 hours ago
I had fatigue when younger, I ended up with mental health issues like agoraphobia and could hardly make it to my mail box. Once I found the healthy regiment of vitamins, minerals and diet n exercise I slowly got out of the rut. Smoking depletes our bodies of natural cell health and can cause diabetes. I find a balance of temperance and fasting helped me to achieve my current health status. All my blood tests have been excellent news and I continue to enjoy my life in balance of everything in my life and universe. Everything is permitted so don't overdo it.
Shannon70
Quit 2 months 3 weeks ago posted 1 week 4 days ago
Yay nearly 2000 smokes I haven’t smoked!
I noticed I can breathe deeply and blood pressure lowered.
But recently I was looking in the mirror and I noticed my complexion isn’t dull or yellowish(smokers look) underneath is clear.
If that’s a benefit I’m never looking back.
So far I haven’t used patches since 2 weeks smoke free but had copious amounts of gum and lozenges. Now, I realized I haven’t had gum in 3 days.
It sounds easy, it isn’t but am very thankful
4 Comments last reply 1 week ago
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Wow Shannon70, congratulations!! Your are doing an amazing job and I know it is not easy, but your resilience and determination is shining through! I am so glad that you are noticing all the health benefits from quitting smoking and it sounds like these are motivating you to keep going! As you continue on this journey, remember that the health benefits and psychological benefits will keep increasing. Your body's energy will increase, walking will become easier, and your lung function will keep improving. Keep up the amazing work we are all so proud of you! Thank you for sharing with us your success, I hope you are celebrating it!
cassandraneilson Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Shannon70, that's amazing you've had 2000 cigarettes you haven't smoked. Keep up the good and hard work!
Beeswax Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Congrats. Tomorrow marks my one year and it says I am darn near 10,000 smokes and like you, wow! WOW, right!

I saw your post and remembered how I felt as you posted, it was like yesterday. I had thought back then that this is as good as it gets.
Nope, it keeps getting better with nice little surprises over the year.

I recently had to have my vehicle fixed and when I went to pick it up a week later, OMG, it didn't smell like smoke anymore. How awesome that I even have smell!!

Keep it up, there are lots of little surprises coming your way.
DianneE Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 years 6 months ago Commented 1 week ago
Beeswax,
Congrats on your one year anniversary! It's such an awesome milestone and the first of many many more. Keep it up, it really does get amazingly easy, something I never expected. I always thought I'd be fighting the cravings the rest of my life, definitely the case.
cassandraneilson
Thinking about quitting posted 1 week 5 days ago
Hi guys, yesterday and today I researched smoking and heart disease and found out that smoking is really dangerous in regards to getting heart disease. Even just one cigarette can cause heart damage that can lead to heart disease. I don't want to get heart disease or lung cancer or other cancers. I really need to quit ASAP.
3 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Shannon70 Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 months 3 weeks ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Yes, quit!
I am at 2 1/2 months smoke free.
I can’t believe the benefits of not smoking, breathe better , lowered blood pressure but recently I noticed my complexion is clear (underneath) I don’t look dull and yellowish. If that is a benefit I am never going back
Do yourself the favor
QuitCoach Kristena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Hi cassandraneilson, it sounds like you are finding more reasons to quit that are motivating you! There are so many benefits to quitting smoking such as decreasing your risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer in your lungs, mouth, throat, and esophagus, and plenty more amazing health benefits. Not only are there health benefits, but there are also psychological benefits as well! The mental strength and confidence you gain from quitting can also be a huge motivator. Try writing down and exploring more motivations and imagine your life as a non-smoker. You can do this!! There is no better time than the present :)
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
Thanks for that reminds me of the heart hits I feel when smoking. I know it's a good reason to quit. Still I will relapse every so often when I get temptation come to me. I can't stop myself from being a junkie. I can only cut down as I can't afford to use every day and I like taking a break from addiction to sober up and better my health so despite the odd social smoke I will exercise and nutrition and I have recovered from stroke and diabetes. When I'm older I don't plan to keep going. I plan to be a stubborn old Wiseman who shuns all the bad stuff and remains firm in my stance to be substance free. Right now just isn't happening. Good luck with your quit.
TonyGojevic
Quit 1 month 1 week ago posted 1 week 5 days ago
So I'm a month cigarette free... Yeah me, but it hasn't been without its struggles. I have quit many times over the 50 plus years that I have smoked. The longest I went was about 3 years, the shortest was about 3 seconds ;) But I feel that this time I have it beat. The one thing that dawned on me recently was that when I slipped in the past and lit up I realized I didn't get any real satisfaction from the cigarette which required me to have several in a row and the only reason I was lightning up was to satisfy a mental craving not the nicotine. I'm not sure I'm expressing myself clearly but this time when a craving hits I just tell myself that lightning up isn't going to curb the craving, just make things worse. I take a deep breath and think about how much better I feel since I quit. Along with my COPD and my heart issues, I have lots of reasons to stay quit, and hopefully I can encourage my wife to quit, time will tell.
4 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 2 months ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Hi T. G. Congratulations on achieving this wonderful milestone! You are doing fantastic at 1 month smoke-free! Keep going strong. It's inspiring to hear about your journey and the insights you've gained along the way. Navigating through the challenges of quitting after over 50 years of smoking is undoubtedly commendable. Smoking didn't bring you real satisfaction in the past and recognizing that it was more about satisfying a mental craving, is a powerful realization. You have a strong awareness of your triggers and cravings, and you're actively choosing healthier coping mechanisms to overcome them. Way to go! Your determination to remind yourself of the negative consequences of smoking and focus on the positive improvements in your health since quitting is truly admirable. Please continue with your amazing quit journey and keep reaffirming your commitment to staying smoke-free, especially during challenging moments. Your willingness to share your journey and encourage your wife to quit smoking is incredibly supportive and inspiring. Your successful quit story and encouragement may have a profound impact on your wife's decision to quit in the future. Thank you for sharing with us today and keep up the excellent work, T.G.! Stay strong, stay motivated, and continue embracing your smoke-free life one day at a time. Cheers to your continued success!
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Yay T.G. 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻 Stay strong … sounds like you have had some epiphanies already 🌼
TonyGojevic Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Thanks for the encouragement, yes I have had a few epiphanies... The biggest being it's not the nicotine I'm missing but the mental connection to various activities associated with the smoking. Once I realized that having one cigarette wasn't going to give me the satisfaction I craved I became a committed non smoker now looking for new habits to occupy my "free" time.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
3 years is amazing, I'm sure you have a good chance to do that again. Do some research on how to improve your health and body so you can live longer than expected. I just overcome diabetes and stroke. Still like your wife I think I am able. I struggled to quit even when breathless. I'm more breathless when I don't get the fix of nicotine. I noticed that the satisfaction for me comes when saturating my throat for a throat hit that calms my brain. Ahhhhh. But don't let me tempt you I hate chain smoking and stop after only one an hour. Sometimes I have stretched a pack for ten months. I am only human and I can't beat smoke craves all the time. I wake in the morning craving like a lunatic. Sorry I don't think I have been helpful to you but that is my headspace
Maria222
Quit 3 weeks 5 days ago posted 1 week 6 days ago
I have a question or concern, I'm not sure which. This isn't my first time quitting, but it will be my last. I'm extremely exhausted phyiscally. This didn't happen the last time I quit. I had so much energy shortly after my last smoke. I'm struggling this time. I swear I had more energy going to the gym while i was smoking then i do now. I can barely do my regular strenght training routing without feeling completely exhausted and wanting to leave because it feels like i'm wasting my time now.
No i'm not going back to smoking, just something ive noticed and it peaked today.
4 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 2 months ago Commented 1 week 6 days ago
Hi Maria, congratulations on being 1 week and 5 days smoke-free! That's a great achievement, and you are doing awesome! Keep going strong. We are sorry to hear that you experienced a tough time. Feeling physically exhausted during the early stages of quitting smoking is not uncommon. Your body is undergoing significant changes as it adjusts to life without nicotine. While some people may experience increased energy levels shortly after quitting, others may feel more fatigued initially. Every quit journey is unique. Fatigue is a common withdrawal symptom, and it can take 2 to 4 weeks for your energy levels to get back to normal. If you have any questions or concerns about your fatigue, please talk to a healthcare provider. You may also call us anytime for support. We are here for you. It's great that you're staying committed to your decision to quit smoking, even when faced with challenges like fatigue. Please continue to listen to your body and give yourself time to adapt. Your body is healing, and it may take some time to regain your energy levels fully. As for your gym routine, it's normal to feel like your performance has changed since quitting smoking. As your body adjusts to being smoke-free, you may find that your endurance and stamina improve gradually. In the meantime, try to be patient with yourself and focus on incorporating healthy habits into your routine, such as staying hydrated, eating nutritious foods, and getting plenty of rest. Thank you for sharing with us today and keep up the fantastic work, Maria! You can do this!
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 1 week 6 days ago
Hi Maria, thank you for reaching out to our QuitNow online community forum with your inquiry about your quit. First I would like to say congratulations on achieving almost 2 weeks smoke-free in your Quit Journey. That is a great achievement and takes a lot of hard work and commitment Maria. I love that you show such dedication to achieving your goal in your declaration that this will be your last quit! I am sorry to hear you are struggling at this point in your journey. I hope it offers you some assurance that additional fatigue is a very common withdrawal symptom when we quit. If you can picture it though, you are doing taxing, hard work that involves both your body and brain healing and withdrawalling from it's nicotine addiction. Healing takes extra energy and allowing yourself that time for self care, or some naps, and giving yourself the grace to know you are listening to what your body needs and taking care of it; certainly not wasting your time. You are in fact honoring the process in your dedication to your health. Should you continue to feel pressured by your level of fatigue please reach out to a pharmacist or your physician for a conversation. I wish you all the continued success Maria!
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
I also had extreme fatigue when I first quit for about a month. I think it's completely normal. I think it's beause nicotine is constantly keeping you alert and once its gone the body has to figure it out on its own again. Same with digestion, nicotine helps the process and so digestion and constipation become a problem for awhile until the body sorts itself out.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
Be sure that smoking won't fix this problem!
You have begun a life changing course and you have to stay the course. The benefits will keep coming soon you won't be able to ignore the positive change your quit can achieve for you. If you can quit smoking you can do anything you set your mind to.
marteng123
Quitting in 1 week 3 days posted 1 week 6 days ago
-smoked for 50 years
-had 4 stents put in 20 years ago
-Just had open heart surgery, released from hospital Mon 4/1
-using lozenges and puffer
-Getting serious craving throughout the day
5 Comments last reply 1 week ago
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 1 week 6 days ago
Hi marteng123, thank you for sharing pieces of your story that has lead you to the goal of wanting to live smoke-free. I am glad you have found your way to sharing with our QuitNow online community. I know you will find safety, support, inspiration, education, and motivation to continue in striving to achieve your goal within our online community forum. I am pleased to see you have established a quit date for yourself marteng123. This will allow you time to prepare for your quit. In doing so you can start to fully understand the motivations you have for wanting to live smoke-free. You will be able to take the time to identify the triggers that are causing you to encounter those serious cravings throughout the day, and plan ways to overcome them. I am glad you have taken the time to choose which NRT's you want to use to assist you in achieving your goal to live smoke-free. These will assist you in managing some of those cravings as well marteng123. You have shown courage in sharing with us on the forum, and commitment to achieving your goal in your preparation. Should you decide you would like to engage in counseling to assist your quit please reach out to one of our quit coaches at 1-877-455-2233. We would be honored to be a part of your quit journey marteng123. All the best to you.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 5 months ago Commented 1 week 6 days ago
I am glad your surgery is done and now you can focus on healing marteng123 🌻. The cravings suck I know especially at the beginning. The silver lining is that eventually they will become less intense. You don’t need to worry about anything other than today … breathe and use all the tools you have just to get through these first few days. I am really happy you are here with us!
marteng123 Log in or register to post comments
Quitting in 1 week 3 days Commented 1 week 6 days ago
Not sure I was clear before but, my last puff/cigarette was 22 days ago. Now that I'm back home I'm noticing all the triggers....and there are many. The good thing is that my wife doesn't and has never smoked and she's being very supportive. Thanks to everyone here for your support and encouragement as well.
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 1 month ago Commented 1 week 6 days ago
Hi Marteng123, thank you so much for clarifying your original post. Congratulations on your achievement of living a smoke-free life for 22 days! That is a fantastic achievement Marteng123. Now that you are home and noticing all the triggers you can credit yourself for having that insight into what is triggering you and employ the strategies that have worked for you in remaining smoke-free for the last 22 days. I am so pleased that you have wonderful support in the relationship with your wife. It is so important to know who we can turn to when we want to share both the triumphs, and challenges that come with our Quit Journey. I am happy to hear you recognize this and are grateful for this relationship and support. We will also love to be a part of your support system throughout your quit journey, and offer you the encouragement and support for your continued success marteng123! I am so very proud of you, I hope you are as well!
Shannon70 Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 months 3 weeks ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Congratulations!
You are doing it too!
The triggers are numerous and the habit of lighting up too.
Again congrats!