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Don
Quit 1 month ago posted 1 week 1 day ago
Good day to everyone and all the best wherever you may be on your Quit Quest.

Fortunately, as of today I am still an abstainer despite experiencing about 99.9% of the common nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Not a shocking surprise after more than half a century of abusing myself each and every time I lit up. Luckily, most symptoms both physical and psychological seem to pass fairly quickly and I look forward to another day without the company of the friend that’s been trying to kill me all this time.

I’ve been receiving Text Tips on quitting and staying quit on my mobile phone. LOL Not a real person? yes, I know but at least it’s a friend that isn’t trying to kill me. :-))

Have a great day and success in your struggle to be free.
6 Comments last reply 6 days ago
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 months 1 week ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
congratulations Don! You are doing it! I feel exactlly the same way. I also had many symptoms and continue to have some adjustment especially with heartburn and digestion....seems to be where my body needs to catch up still. As you say it wasn't a good friend to have!
123Jake Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
“Quit Quest” I love it! 😂
Congratulations Don! Doesn’t it feel great! And yes, the text updates make me feel good too - like someone is checking in on me! My friends don’t seem to care about me quitting (they are all smokers) and I’ve attempted to quit so many times before that I don’t think they believe I’ll be successful. But like I’ve said before, something is different this time and I know I will never smoke again. We’re doing it!
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 4 months ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Hi Don, congratulations on your commitment to your own 'Quit Quest', I love that moniker I have to say. Your motivation to live smoke-free has lead you to achieving 3 weeks and 1 day smoke-free and a whole lot of insight into your triggers, and overcoming your cravings. I am so pleased you have realized you are stronger than your addiction and that those 'toxic friends' we call cigarettes don't have to keep you from discovering the strength you possess in learning new ways of living smoke-free! I am glad you have found the Text Tips to be a helpful method of support along your quit journey. All the best in living your smoke-free life Don.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Congratulations Don 🎉🎉🎉 I get the feeling this time your heels are dug in and you are determined that this time will stick! One foot in front of the other is all we can do (and I am included in that too). I hope you have another amazing day of abstinence 🤗
Don Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Thank you so much to all of you for taking the time. Nice to know you're there.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 7 hours ago
Hey Don, I was wondering how you doing. Best news all week. I love seeing someone conquer this dreaded poison. It's been 41 years of on and off smoking. I been trying to quit every day for 14 years now and I have had mild success in completely abstaining. I guess I have lots more to learn. Thanks for your post.
123Jake
Quit 1 month 1 week ago posted 1 week 1 day ago
30 days today!
760 cigarettes not smoked!

Wow. Those cigarettes really add up fast. I can’t believe what I was doing to my body. I feel so much better and it’s only been one month! Whoo hoo!
6 Comments last reply 1 week ago
Don Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Bravo!!! well done.
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 months 1 week ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Amazing how many add up in such a short amount of time. I like to add the money part.
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 4 months ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Hi 123Jake, congratulations on reaching an amazing milestone. 1 month smoke-free is a tremendous achievement, and we are so grateful you have chosen to share this wonderful moment with our QuitNow community forum. I am so pleased to hear the excitement from your post in the acknowledgment that you are reaping health rewards already. I hope you continue on your sustained Quit Journey and build on all those cigarettes you have not smoked and continue reaping the rewards of the smoke-free life you so deserve.
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
🎉🎉🎉🎉🎉🎉
Pameloutsa Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 weeks 5 days ago Commented 1 week ago
Great job 123Jake ! You got this :)
Tamara L. Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 week ago
Way to go!
cassandraneilson
Quitting in 1 month 3 weeks posted 1 week 2 days ago
Awhile ago, I did some research and found that cannabis is really helpful for people like myself who suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - it helps people get deeper sleep so I started having cannabis at night and it worked. There is a problem with this, however, and that is that I started having cannabis during the day and then early in the am when I still have insomnia. Soon, I was having it all day and all night. Not good. This morning, I haven't had any cannabis and I'm only going to have it at night from now on. So, since I had no cannabis this morning I'm edgy and full of anxiety energy and I'm coping by chainsmoking. Also, not good.

When I have been successful in the past with reducing my smoking I wasn't having cannabis. One thing at a time. Now that I've found something that helps with sleep I don't want to mess with it by having it at times other than at night. I have to accept that I may smoke more cigarettes in the short term, but that in the long term limiting cannabis to before bedtime is very helpful with reducing smoking cigarettes at other times.

I didn't learn when I was growing up how to practise moderation with substances and I'm learning it now. This will help me reduce my smoking cigarettes. One day at a time. By tomorrow, I'll be used to limiting the cannnabis to bedtime and will be able to tackle next reducing cigarettes. I'm just grateful today that I've found something that helps with sleep. Things can only get better I hope. Take care all.
3 Comments last reply 6 days ago
cassandraneilson Log in or register to post comments
Quitting in 1 month 3 weeks Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Era, thanks for your concern. I know what you are saying . I've dabbled in cannabis for all my life and it has never caused me psychosis or any other psychiatric concerns. I take it because I'm desperate to get better sleep at night so that I have the energy to fight the battle of tobacco during my waking hours. I've talked to experts on cannabis and have determined that it is safe for me to use if used sparingly - just at night.

It's important to keep an open mind about these things. I used to think I had alcoholism and swore off alcohol for 30 years and now, just recently, I've been enjoying a beer with dinner once or twice a week. I'm learning moderation only now at age 61. This will help me reduce and then quit my smoking cigarettes. I'm happy for you Era that your quit is going strong. Keep up the good work.
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 4 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Hi Cassandra, thank you for sharing your quit journey with us. It sounds like you've been doing a lot of self-reflection and taking important steps toward improving your health. Recognizing the impact of cannabis on your sleep and your smoking habits is a big step forward. It's completely understandable that you might feel edgy and anxious while making these adjustments. Managing one change at a time is a smart approach, and focusing on limiting cannabis use to bedtime can help you establish a better sleep routine, which is crucial for overall well-being. Here’s a link for some information on cannabis: https://quitnow.ca/faq/about-cannabis

Reducing smoking while adjusting your cannabis use is a significant challenge, but you're aware of what works best for you, and that's key. Moderation is a skill that takes time to develop, and you're on the right path. It's great that you've found something that helps with your sleep, and as you get more accustomed to your new routine, reducing your cigarette intake will likely become more manageable. Stay strong and keep taking it one day at a time. We're here to support you, and your journey is inspiring to many of us. Things will get better, and you're making positive changes that will benefit your health in the long run. Take care and keep us posted on your progress!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 7 hours ago
Hopefully you can quit the weed later too. Sometimes makes me cough up a lung. I use meth for my weight issues. Doctor told me whatever I can do to lose the weight would benefit my diabetes. Smoking tobacco is so bad for my diabetes. Weed I know has no death statistics like tobacco so I concur with a lot of others that weed is okay. But you know some downsides like when you don't have weed and you replace it with a cigarette. You got to take the tobacco right off the table of options. Know that deep breaths can help instead. Breath in and hold for 5 seconds then release it out for 7 secs. You should feel calmer and with oxygen going to the brain you can be more focused on waiting for those crazy craves to pass.
era
Quit 1 year 4 months ago posted 1 week 3 days ago
What happened to Smoker4life?...is his/her account really deleted?

I adored how he/she was so genuine and frank. Nicotine withdrawal is profoundly ugly. You're told symptoms are severe at first, and the intensity tends to decrease --- but that's not always true. Factors like how long and heavily you smoked must be considered. Sure, I successfully quit after 55 yrs, but not without it turning my entire world inside out - caused major upheaval.🤪🤪🤪
4 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 4 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Hi Era, thank you for the shout out for Smoker4life. We hope to hear from them soon. You're absolutely right about nicotine withdrawal being a complex and often grueling process. The severity of withdrawal symptoms can vary greatly from person to person, influenced by factors like the duration and intensity of smoking habits. Thanks again for sharing your experience and continuing to support others in this community. Your story serves as a powerful reminder that while quitting smoking can be incredibly challenging, it's also profoundly rewarding. Keep up the fantastic work and know that your journey inspires many of us to stay strong and committed.
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 1 week 2 days ago
I'm not going to sugarcoat the harsh reality of quitting smoking, which is sobering.

Hardest thing I've ever done...a sentiment shared by many ex-smokers. However, there are varying experiences, and some individuals find it surprisingly easy!

Good luck in your journey. I hope it goes well for you. 🍀
123Jake Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
“Nicotine withdrawal is profoundly ugly.” OMG! That is so true! I smoked for 45 years and I was in bed severely sick for three days after I quit. Then the withdrawal continued for two weeks at a less intense level. It’s been a month now though and I feel much better! The withdrawal will pass eventually and it’s so worth it in the long run! So hang in there smoker4life! And thanks for being so inspiring era! If you can reach a year and three months, so can I!!!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 7 hours ago
He talked a lot like a smoker who didn't want to quit and just like me will probably smoke another ten years before breaking free. Mind needs to be set to quitting time. Change your thoughts change your life.
Darci
Quit 3 weeks 4 days ago posted 1 week 4 days ago
Hi Everyone!

It's 2 weeks today! I'm feeling quite proud of myself because it hasn't been easy. I used to have a smoke first thing in the morning when I let my dogs out in the yard. Now I lay in bed 5 extra minutes and then just watch them until they do their business before getting ready for work. I still feel a tingle of anticipation getting in my car to drive to work. I really loved smoking when driving. The morning cravings are still there but manageable. I like that when I get to work I don't have to wash my hands and feel self conscious hanging my stinky coat next to other peoples nice fresh ones.

I'm not having any problems with mid day cravings- even the drive home and back for lunch are okay. However...a half hour before work ends I get the little niggles of cravings that get worse as getting off work gets closer. Yesterday I used the deep breaths half way home and I got over the craving for a while. I used to light up as soon as I got in my car then have another smoke when I got home to let my dogs out. The rest of the evening was a smoking free for all and that is the time I am still struggling with.

The texts that come offer suggestions and it really is helpful to make changes to my routine. I can't change everything though- like driving home from work. I need to keep telling myself that it's better than it was the first few days and to not let the cravings take over my thoughts. I'm using the patch- so I know it's not a purely physical craving. It's 37 years of developing a smoking habit that has been part of nearly everything I do every day!

I will keep on keeping on. Out of the blue my daughter contacted me to congratulate me on the two weeks- it meant a lot to me that she has it in her mind. Also when she saw me a couple of days ago she commented that I'm not coughing as much. Having validation from her really helps me keep focused on why I'm quitting.

Also, I still have money in by bank account!

I'm not rewarding myself with things like a spa day, or dinner out but I am buying good groceries with lots of fresh produce, a few treats and items to make better meals. The crunch fruit/veggie snacks are helpful and I making a good dinner is helping me with the evening cravings quite a bit because it's a good distraction.

I'm no longer waking up at 4AM having trouble breathing and having to use my inhaler and cough for an hour until I can breathe well enough to sleep again. That's a big deal and it does help me keep the health benefits in mind.


I haven't been on the forum for a few days and so I took some time to catch up on some comments. Hat's off to all of you with your success! Chin up to all of you working towards your quit day, it is very scary. And for those of you with doubts, different things work for different people and maybe what makes you a successful quitter hasn't found you yet.

I am only 2 weeks in so I could still slip too. I personally don't like the phrase one day at a time. For me I like the milestones, one week, two weeks, now getting to one month.

Thanks for being here to share your stories and offer support!

6 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Yay Darci 🎉🎉🎉🎉🎉. I love your updates and I really love that your daughter is keeping a mindful heart on your days in. It does matter having support around you.

One thing I did to help with my car rides is I would pick really nice smelling air fresheners that made me happy to smell when I got into the car. May seem silly, but it made me happy. All of the little things we did, smoke in hand, just takes time to get past. I honestly still have moments and that’s ok, I say to myself. It’s ok to feel yucky because that is what some days are like. You got through it, and there will be more but you are stronger inside today than you were two and a half weeks ago! I know I say it all the time, but believe me when I say I am so proud of you. I know how hard it can be, and your efforts are felt by all of us who have weathered the moments as well. You deserve a treat! ❤️
Stanley Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 1 month ago Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Hi Darci,

you already passed the hell week, Also the craving is manageable. Your family and daughter also support you.
So that you are not alone.

Cheer you up and KEEP NOPE

Stand firm to say No to nicodemon
QuitCoach Emilie Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Hi Darci!

Thank you so much for the fantastic update. I always love reading these. I am happy to hear the strategies you put forth are really working for you. This is great. Milestones are very important so keep shouting yourself out. We are always happy to celebrate with everyone here. I am also really happy to hear that you are sleeping better and seeing the health benefits all ready. Isn't that so rewarding? Guess what that will only keep getting better as well.

Keep up the fantastic work Darci and I look forward to being on this journey with you and hearing about all the strides your making. Keep it up!
cassandraneilson Log in or register to post comments
Quitting in 1 month 3 weeks Commented 1 week 2 days ago
Hey Darci, I'm so happy for you that you are succeeding at quitting. There really are great pay offs to quitting and you are reaping them now that you are not smoking. Keep up the great work, you are doing fantastic.
123Jake Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Hi Darci!
Congratulations on reaching 2weeks! That’s huge. It was a big milestone for me. That’s when I realized I was actually doing it! It sounds like the car is a big trigger for you. Have you tried audio books? A straw for your mouth? Water with a straw? Carrot sticks? It sounds like you’re coping pretty well at home. Maybe it’s just a matter of setting yourself up for the same kind of success in your car?
Whatever you do, keep on going! You’re getting rid of the disgusting habit we’re all fighting.
I too am rewarding myself with healthy food and also spending time finding new healthy recipes and you’re right, it’s a good distraction.
Hang in there! You’re doing it!!!
Whoo hoo!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 7 hours ago
Getting rid of those smoking thoughts is hard I try to replace them with a distraction thought something new to look at. I like passing the time with something to do besides smoke. I stay busy with work and at home I cook, clean, watch videos, reading and writing are my usual go to.
cassandraneilson
Quitting in 1 month 3 weeks posted 1 week 4 days ago
Update: I have a goal of smoking 6 cigarettes a day down from 15 the days before. This smaller number is working out great. I just keep 6 cigarettes for the day in a jar and every time I get a cigarette from the jar I see how many are left. When I'm not smoking I'm not watching the clock because I don't have any cigarettes in my schedule - (no predecided times to smoke). Today feels diferent, less complicated. It leaves me with energy and a clear mind to do things other than smoking. Hope I can continue to succeed with this plan. How is everyone else feeling?
4 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Pameloutsa Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 weeks 5 days ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
That's fantastic cassandraneilson. You're doing great and I bet you it will get better every day :)
QuitCoach Emilie Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Hi Cassandraneilson

I am so happy this method is working for you and is more manageable for you. This is what we want in a quit. To be as manageable as possible right? Seems like your really figuring out what works best for YOU! I am so happy to hear that and look forward to more updates on how this is going for you!
123Jake Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
I cut down by half before I quit and it really helped make the actual quit easier. Good luck Cassandra!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
I was at 3 smokes a day now it crept up to 5. I will have no more smokes left at this rate but I don't mind hanging out anymore. Just Deep breaths of air to my brain and it does the trick. A real switch to something healthy. I will never fall for the lies again that I need one! Totally false. All I need is air, water, food, exercise. And some stimulating activities.
Jennfrombc
Quitting in 6 days 9 hours posted 1 week 4 days ago
I was diagnosed with bladder cancer in 2020 and still didn't quit 2 weeks ago I had a mini stroke and I believe it's due to smoking.. I want to be there when my kids marry..enough is enough
3 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Welcome aboard Jennfrombc. I’m so sorry about the medical issues you have been challenged with! If you are ready to do this, we are ready to support you 🤗. I hope that you are feeling better as well. Keep us in the loop as you go 😊
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 4 months ago Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Hi Jennfrombc, welcome to QuitNow community and congratulations on your decision to quit smoking! We are so glad you’re here and thank you for sharing your story with us. We are so sorry to hear about the health challenges you've faced. We hope that you are feeling better. You are determined and motivated to quit smoking for your future and your family. Deciding to quit is a powerful step, and you've already shown immense strength by making that decision. Way to go! Your desire to be there for your kids and improve your health is a powerful motivator. You can do this! Please know you're not alone in this journey. We're here to support you every step of the way and feel free to contact us anytime. Together, we can navigate the ups and downs of quitting smoking and celebrate the victories, no matter how small. Whenever you encounter challenges or need support, don't hesitate to reach out to the community here. You may also consider reaching out to healthcare professionals for guidance and support tailored to your specific needs. They can provide valuable resources and strategies to help you succeed in achieving your goal of being smoke-free. Thank you for joining us today and please know we are all here cheering for you!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
I don't think it is just smoking but your entire lifestyle seems to be fatigued by smoking and other poor choices. Keep putting in the effort and learn all you can to change your life around. Best of luck on your journey
cassandraneilson
Quitting in 1 month 3 weeks posted 1 week 4 days ago
I've been working on limiting my smoking and it's not working. All the counting cigarettes, watching the clock all day, forced to think about smoking all my waking hours. I had the goal of 15 cigarettes a day. To simplify I'm changing my goal to 6 cigarettes a day because that's the minimum I can smoke without my psychiatric symptoms getting bad. I've found that if my goal is 15 cigarettes a day I'll smoke 20, if my goal is 10 I'll smoke 15 or 16. So, with a goal of 6 a day I'll hopfully smoke less than 10. I wish I never started smoking. It's really important for me to eventually get down to 6 a day no matter what. Everything gets better when I'm not smoking much. I hope I can do this.
4 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
🙏🏻
Quit Coach Linda Log in or register to post comments
Quit 9 years 4 months ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Hi Cassandra, thank you for sharing your journey with us. It's wonderful to hear that you want to adjust your goals based on what you find works best for you. Setting a target of 6 cigarettes a day sounds like a thoughtful and strategic approach to manage your smoking while being mindful of your mental health. Here are a few suggestions that might help you with this new goal: continue to track your progress and keep a journal. This can help you stay aware and accountable without feeling overwhelmed. Identify triggers: Pay attention to the situations or feelings that make you want to smoke. Finding alternatives for these moments, like a walk or deep breathing exercises, can be very helpful. Every time you stick to your goal or even get close to it, take a moment to acknowledge your success. Small victories build up to big changes. Stay connected: Continue reaching out to your Quit Coach and this community. Sharing your experiences and getting support can make a huge difference. Be kind to yourself: It’s okay if you don’t hit your target every single day. What matters is that you are making progress and continuing to try. You’ve already shown great resilience and self-awareness by recognizing what works best for you and adjusting your approach. Keep going strong, Cassandra. You can do this!
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
You have integrity! 💛 Your posts are now filled with honesty and truthfulness, which is a facet of moral character that connotes many positive and virtuous attributes.

You have a serious disease that is NOT YOUR FAULT! It's a health condition that arises from a complex interplay of factors.

Anyways, getting back to your goal of 6 cigs daily - that sounds reasonable. Even as a former heavy smoker I think I could have maybe managed that.

You have my empathy, understanding and support.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
I think I got to a temperate amount of smokes when I made a pack last 10 months. Other than that 10 a day is still heavy smoking. I don't smoke much I don't think usually just the odd one some mornings. But all the tips and tricks I learned from everyone here and there was key in helping me cut down. I couldn't go one day without smoking before everyone helped me to get to one day. Then I'd go a whole month on one to two smokes very occasionally and put it down start a new quit. Sometimes I could only manage several hours before I cracked. But that's how I cut down by doing as many mini quits as possible. Oh the savings that 10 months quit gave me. Had no financial issues affording things that year. Too bad I couldn't stay quit because smoking makes life hard.
Pameloutsa
Quit 2 weeks 5 days ago posted 1 week 5 days ago
I have been smoking for over 20 years and have tried quitting numerous times. Have tried the nicotine patches, gum, the medication etc. nothing worked for me. I thought it was because I enjoyed it so much that nothing really worked but I was wrong.
I never really enjoyed smelling like a garbage can or spending half of my fortune on cigarettes. I felt horrible being the only one that had to leave an event to go outside and feed my addiction monster. And giving empty promises to my family, friends and my doctor? Horrible feeling.
But something is different this time. This time I'm being honest to myself and facing the truth. I dont enjoy it - I was just afraid of quitting. I was afraid of making the change and facing the withdrawals and filling up my time with something different. I was afraid that I will change, that I will gain weight, that I will be so upset and angry all the time and snap at everyone around me.
Well, it's been a week to the day, and I gotta say I dont miss it. I haven't changed (at least not yet lol), the same things and people frustrate me the same amount and if I gain some weight well ... who cares? At least the food now tastes better and now that I dont spend a fortune on smokes I have the money to go to a gym or try an activity that will help with that.
It's tough but not impossible. We are stronger than our addictions and there are tools to help and support us. I think I got this and I hope the same for everyone that is on the same journey.
Sorry for the very long message :)
5 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
I love your message and congratulations on one week in Pameloutsa 🤗. You are an inspiration … keep us in the loop as it goes. And yes, we are stronger than our addictions .. you took your power back 😊
QuitCoach Emilie Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Hi Pameloutsa,

Thank you for being here and sharing your journey with all of this. Quitting is hard and many have similar journeys to yours being back and fourth with their quit. Coming to terms with the fact that you are continuing to do something that you no longer enjoy but are still doing shows great strength as well. Being afraid of quitting is what often holds people back and I am sure many here will attest to that. So I am happy you concurred this fear! Good for you!
Healthy activities are such a great form of distraction and will also help with all the added health benefits you will also see from not smoking. Glad your seeing ALL the benefits from being smoke free all ready! I commend you for all your efforts and sharing this amazing post with all of us. Look forward to hearing more amazing things coming your way. Keep it up!
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 months 1 week ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Hey congratulations….way to go! I too tried many times but this time was different for me too!
123Jake Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 month 1 week ago Commented 1 week 1 day ago
Pamelousta,
I relate to every single thing you said and couldn’t agree more. I think giving up nicotine altogether (NRT’s too) really made the difference for me this time.
I also hated the way I smelled. It took quite a while to get rid of the smell in my apartment - even though I smoked outdoors , my furniture, bedding, clothes, and towels all smelled smoky, even after I washed them they still smelled smoky. It took about three washes to totally get rid of it. Now my place smells wonderful and I have so much more time to clean.
Something is different with me this time too. I just know I won’t smoke again. Life is just better smoke-free.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
I just had one. I can't wrap my mind around the whole world filled with smokers. And now vapers. I have a vape too to last the week. Congratulations on hell week seems you had fun beating the addiction. Sooner or later we will tire of the work it takes to remain a smoker. Something happened to me too after I deep breathed a craving away. I felt no need for smokes but everyone started giving me smokes and I just took them because that's all I know from decades of experience. I know it takes a strong mind to dismiss smoking again and I pray to Jesus that I can start quitting right after my packet finishes. I give most my smokes away but some days I wake to the most hellish craves imaginable. I'm going to push thru this time and get me a week quit. We got this quit buddy. I want to say I will never again put yucky chemicals in me but I been trying for the last 14 years saying the same thing. I won't give up trying and I have had a few good quits lasting many months but my breath year quit anniversary has eluded me 3 times. The withdrawal about depression being masked by smoking got me on month 11. Thanks for your post It really helps me mentally to stick with the quit.
Anonymous (not verified) Edit Delete
Thinking about quitting posted 1 week 5 days ago
OK, it's been 17 days without cigarettes. I don't feel any different other than depressed and angry. Not to mention the lack of focus. Seems to me I was happier when I smoked. And I know people will say "it gets better, just wait". Not buying that just like I'm not buying the self help routines, like take a deep breath, drink some water?! You obviously do not understand the nature of addiction.
8 Comments last reply 6 days ago
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 4 months ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Hi Smoker4life, I can definitely hear your frustration, and I am truly empathetic with what you are feeling and going through in this part of your quit journey. I am however encouraged at the fact that you are reaching out to the community forum as a source of support. That does show on some level you do want to remain smoke-free, and you have shown strong commitment in doing so when you have felt so depressed, and angry. So congratulations on achieving your goal while being truly challenged with these withdrawal symptoms. I can only speak for myself as an addict in recovery that I learn new things, and discover new strategies almost daily to remain in recovery. Also addiction is difficult to overcome and comes with a whole bunch of other things we need to encounter, deal with, and learn new ways of coping with why we chose to use and abuse in the first place. Not one method is going to work for everyone, and not everything you try will assuage your desire to smoke. The 4D's as you mentioned are strategies that will help and have been proven effective in overcoming cravings; they don't make all the withdrawal symptoms magically disappear. I wish I could offer you that. I hope you continue in your pursuit. I encourage you to lean on the close friend that you mentioned for support. If you want 1 to 1 support to assist you on this journey we would love to assist you. We are only a call away at 1-877-455-2233. If you find your depression is worsening, and your anger is unmanageable please reach out to a physician to discuss what alternatives may lead to a healthier and happy life Smoker4life.
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Hi Smoker4life!

I applaud you for daring to voice an opinion that doesn't match with the current compulsory narrative. 💜
Anonymous Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Deleted account.
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 months 1 week ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
I love your honesty!
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 months 1 week ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
That first month is pretty tough fyi. I had no focus, felt depressed, and my body was not happy on a multitude of ways. But I can say that once that first month passed my mood and body started to feel much better to the point where I almost feel normal now. I do have cravings though but I spend less time thinking about what I might be missing. It’s a major mind f*”k this addiction and it is not logical at all. I think something as hard as this must be given a lot of time to play out before deciding to go back to it. My opinion. And those of us who are rah rah are just trying to offer encouragement and support no matter how small the achievement.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
I understand that I have been addicted for all my life. Deep breaths didn't help me earlier on thru the years so I used NRT and vape. The oxygen going to your brain helps clear away the brain fog that smokers harbour under. It can work if you give it a good try. Breathe in hold for 5 seconds then release the breath for 7 seconds. Somehow when I tried recently being lost for options to quit, I found myself free from craving for the next day or two until people started giving me free smokes which I just smoked and gave out to others. I will use deep breaths for every situation now and if my mind plays along I can stay quit for good.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
I understand that I have been addicted for all my life. Deep breaths didn't help me earlier on thru the years so I used NRT and vape. The oxygen going to your brain helps clear away the brain fog that smokers harbour under. It can work if you give it a good try. Breathe in hold for 5 seconds then release the breath for 7 seconds. Somehow when I tried recently being lost for options to quit, I found myself free from craving for the next day or two until people started giving me free smokes which I just smoked and gave out to others. I will use deep breaths for every situation now and if my mind plays along I can stay quit for good.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
I understand that I have been addicted for all my life. Deep breaths didn't help me earlier on thru the years so I used NRT and vape. The oxygen going to your brain helps clear away the brain fog that smokers harbour under. It can work if you give it a good try. Breathe in hold for 5 seconds then release the breath for 7 seconds. Somehow when I tried recently being lost for options to quit, I found myself free from craving for the next day or two until people started giving me free smokes which I just smoked and gave out to others. I will use deep breaths for every situation now and if my mind plays along I can stay quit for good.
ROLLY
Thinking about quitting posted 1 week 5 days ago
I WANT TO BE HONEST I HAVE STARTED TO SMOKE AGAIN..HAVE BEEN FOR A WHILE WILL TRY AGAIN WHEN IM REALLY GOING TO BE SERIOUS.
4 Comments last reply 6 days ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Rolly it’s ok! No matter what, you are trying. There will come a time you will say enough of this and that will be that! Keep giving it a go because it will happen for you ☺️
QuitCoach Emilie Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Hi Rolly,

Thank you for coming on and being vulnerable and sharing that information with us! Do know that quits are NEVER easy and we admire all the efforts you are making. May I suggest having a look at some of the quit motivations that led you to making the change in the first place. Sometimes that can really drive us to even start thinking about it again.

You will do what is rest and best for you when you are ready and we are all here for you and still cheering you on as we believe in you Rolly!
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 months 1 week ago Commented 1 week 4 days ago
Pat yourself on the back for having quit and know that you can do it again when you’re ready.
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 6 days 6 hours ago
I been trying to quit seriously for the last 14 years. I remember my very first month smoking I said two weeks in I think it's time to quit this disgusting foul addiction. I carried on and went from 1 smoke a day to 3 smokes a day and it all spiralled out of my control and I was hooked 35 years ago. I've also chained smoked at times the whole week. Smoking roll your own and tailor-made at the same time. Smoking is not good anymore. We need to quit before we become ill. Try NOPE. As one smoke and you'll start the cycle again. We can do it. Mind power.
Anonymous (not verified) Edit Delete
Thinking about quitting posted 2 weeks ago
I am a smoker and have not smoked for 2 weeks. It is only a matter of time until I smoke again. I enjoy it. It is torture not smoking especially when I enjoy doing it so much. To be honest I'm only signing up for this nonsense because my friend put me up to it.
6 Comments last reply 1 week ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 2 weeks ago
Hi Smoker4life 🤗. How amazing that you have made it this far even feeling down about quitting. Is there anything that has been positive about it? As a former smoker, I completely can relate to your connection to it. I had smoked for so many years, I had no idea what life as a non smoker looked like. I also thought that I would likely not make it because it was connected to every action and feeling I had. I did reach a point in my smoking life where I would observe myself sucking on a stick filled with stuff that would eventually kill me, and wondered why am I doing this? It just seemed pointless for me. Life as a non smoker definitely can have its challenges, but my savings grace is that I fell in love with the freedom, and I also feel good inside my heart. I think your accomplishment of two weeks smoke free is something to celebrate for now. You have given your body a break. You have not been reliant on constantly having to light up. Your friend obviously cares a lot about you and wants to see you around for a long time 😊. I hope you give it an honest go, and look for the little gifts that pop up by choosing health over habit. Sending you a big high five today 🎉🎉
QuitCoach Keri Log in or register to post comments
Quit 23 years 4 months ago Commented 2 weeks ago
Hi Smoker4life, thank you for sharing this part of your QuitJourney with our online community forum. I am hopeful that you will find inspiration, motivation, and support from our wonderful supportive members here that will encourage you to continue with your goal to live smoke-free. What you are feeling are completely normal withdrawal symptoms, and you will overcome those in time. Most of us here that were smokers did at one time quite enjoy it as well, or felt it served some other purpose for us. I am encouraged that you have pretty significant motivations to live smoke-free that you mentioned. I am sorry that you are being challenged by your addiction currently, there are many strategies you can use that can assist you in getting your endorphins released in a healthier way. Getting some physical activity daily, and some fresh air, like going for a 20 minute walk can give you endorphins that will make those uncomfortable feelings subside far more than the effects of smoking a cigarette. I wish you all the best in your Quit Journey and should you wish to access 1 to 1 coaching to assist your quit please call us at 1-877-455-2233. It would be our honor to help you meet your goal Smoker4life.
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 1 week 6 days ago
Yep, Smoker4life,

They often appear over enthusiastic here in respect to quitting smoking.

I've come on here with a few challenges and always get told what they think I want to hear. I would prefer and appreciate more bluntness, candor and veracity.

I'm already well aware of the benefits of quitting, and don't need to hear it incessantly.

Don't mean to sound too contrary though, because the members and Quit Coach gave me a lot of support one time when I was imminently near a relapse...filled me with gratitude. 🌷
Merrena Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 weeks 4 days ago Commented 1 week 6 days ago
Hi
I am also someone who has smoked for 55yrs, it was part of our culture when I started and has always been part of my life. I quit cold turkey 2 weeks ago. Is it easy?no, do I miss it? yes, am I going to start again….. truly hoping not to . One craving at a time, one day at a time
clucke Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 months 2 weeks ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
stick with it....i smoked for 40+ years and have been 3 months without...saved $1500 - 1900 smokes not smoked! and planning another vacation with saved money....
if you have urge....take a walk and drink some water...honestly....helps cut stress and gives you moment to think
you can do this! if i can anyone can
Tamara L. Log in or register to post comments
Quit 6 years ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
Nonsense. Hm. You know, what we’re doing isn’t nonsense, so it’s kinda a slight to me to hear you say that. It would have been nice to hear a rah rah for us, even if you’re not into it. Good luck with doing your friends bidding. Maybe you’ll stop. Maybe not. Attitude is a foundation. I’m not going to try and convince you. I would be just like your friends.
cassandraneilson
Quitting in 1 month 3 weeks posted 2 weeks 1 day ago
I'm in a relapse and trying to stop the runaway train with chain smoking. I have a big problem. I have schizophrenia and when I quit cold turkey, after about a week o f quitting my symptoms get really bad. I've talked to my doctor about it and he didn't think I should make any changes to my medication. Through experimenting I've found I can go down to 6 cigarettes a day before my symptoms get bad. The problem with this is that I'm not very good at limiting my smoking. I find quitting cold turkey easier than limiting my smoking. Right now I'm smoking a pack a day and hating it. I've decided to start small - 5 cigarettes in the morning, 5 in the afernoon, 5 in the evening. and work my way down to 6 cigarettes a day: 2 in the morning, 2 in the afternoon, 2 in the evening. I could really use some support with my plan because it will be hard for me to execute. I just need to get the ball rolling - get a day or two under my belt and that will give me momentum and I think I'll be able to stick to my plan.
4 Comments last reply 2 weeks ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 2 weeks 1 day ago
❤️ I’m sorry this has been such a challenge Cassandra and I’m giving you such a big hug right now. Stopping smoking without having to deal with external medical issues is hard on its own, and you have to fight extra hard! I commend your determination to get your numbers down because I’m sure just focussing on doing that can be stressful in itself. Are you able to sit and do some guided meditations in between your smoking times? I am just trying to think of things to help take your mind off of the stress of counting … remember to do a little celebratory thing each time you win that challenge! I personally love letting my mind wander in meditation, but I must admit it took some practice to quiet my brain chatter. Just keep aiming for the stars Cassandra. I think you can win this 🤗
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 2 weeks 1 day ago
You've really put yourself out on a limb with this post because you are particularly vulnerable, susceptible.

It's long been known that people with schizophrenia are more likely to smoke and self-medicate their symptoms.

Need another reason to quit? Research shows giving up tobacco can reduce, depression, anxiety and stress, as well as improve mood and quality of life.

Disclaimer : This is in no way to be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your mental health professional.
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 months 1 week ago Commented 2 weeks 1 day ago
THe support I have to offer would be to practice some law of attraction of 'what you do want to happen for yourself' and avoid confirming 'what you don't want to happen for yourself'. I do understand you have a seriously difficult disease but affirming what you don't want will not get you anywhere regardless. Give it a try. Smokefree will be better for you because I do not believe nicotine is good for any disease. There are moments of intensity when you quit but remember there are great big moments of elation as well. I wold focus on the elation to get you through.
QuitCoach Emilie Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 2 weeks 1 day ago
Hi Cassandraneilson,

Thank you so much for sharing your Quit Journey so far with our online community and sharing your vulnerability and transparency with us all. I commend your determination to get your numbers down and working through what can be very difficult times. I am thrilled to hear you have an awareness of putting a quit plan that works in place and what is best for you! I hope you are feeling so very proud of yourself. When bringing that number of cigarettes down in the next step of your journey by following some of the talked about strategies; The 4D's, Stress management, self care. Be kind to yourself always and take it one day at a time! Your certainly on the right track and we admire your drive so very much.

I wish you all the best in your continued success, we are so proud of you Cassandraneilson.
MJ
Quit 5 months 1 week ago posted 2 weeks 1 day ago
My profile says this below. I am so thrilled to have quit.

$876
money saved!
1,460 cigarettes not smoked.
8 Comments last reply 1 week ago
Liz S Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 years 8 months ago Commented 2 weeks 1 day ago
Wow MJ doesn’t that blow your mind? Super proud of you! 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 2 weeks 1 day ago
Congratulations MJ!...I hope you've been spending that money. Retail therapy often elicits a sense of exhilaration and can provide even more quitting motivation. 🌸
MJ Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 months 1 week ago Commented 2 weeks 1 day ago
THank you both. Yes indeed I am going through a complete change over at almost 59. No smoking, gym workouts, dropping 'some' menopause weight (that's a whole thread on its own btw), and of course....a new wardrobe has to be part of all the madness. You know!? I have been having so much fun. The first few months I was very unkept - as I did my best to deal with the withdrawal and the very harsh side effects of quitting. Now, I am totally enjoying the make over! Highly recommend this. Also nature abhors a vacuum! So money has to be re-directed shall we say.
QuitCoach Emilie Log in or register to post comments
Thinking about quitting Commented 2 weeks 1 day ago
Hi MJ,

Doesn't seeing that amount totally serve as a fantastic motivation? Do you have any big dreams or goals of what you would like to do with any money saved? I really hope you consider spoiling yourself with a little treat for all this hard work! Keep up the amazing work and seeing that amount of money continue to rise!

Your drive is contagious MJ! Thanks for sharing!
era Log in or register to post comments
Quit 1 year 4 months ago Commented 2 weeks ago
"Dropping some menopause weight"...I wondered if you were a man or a woman, now I know -LOL!

Oh, gawd - you should have seen ME the first few months. Personal hygiene was pushed to the back burner as I fought a fierce battle with the nicodemon. 🌼
Pameloutsa Log in or register to post comments
Quit 2 weeks 5 days ago Commented 1 week 5 days ago
That is awesome!!! Congratulations :) Keep it up
Darci Log in or register to post comments
Quit 3 weeks 4 days ago Commented 1 week 3 days ago
Wow MJ! Great work, and thank you for sharing so we can feel inspired by you! It wonderful to hear that you have been able to get back to having interest in taking care of all facets of MJ- inside and out!
TerryTeo Log in or register to post comments
Quit 5 days 14 hours ago Commented 1 week 3 days ago
$12 a packet! I would love to pay that for a pack. Excuse me I'm craving hard.
Quit Coach Linda
Quit 9 years 4 months ago posted 2 weeks 1 day ago
When quitting smoking or vaping, the journey can often feel overwhelming. The cravings, the physical withdrawal symptoms, and the psychological dependence can create significant stress. This is why it's essential to adopt the approach of taking one moment at a time and one day at a time.

Why taking one moment at a time matters?

Managing cravings: Cravings can be intense but typically last only a few minutes. By focusing on getting through just the next moment, you can break down what seems like an insurmountable challenge into a manageable situation. Each moment you resist the urge to smoke or vape is a victory. Techniques such as meditation, deep breathing, or yoga can help you stay present and manage stress.

Reducing anxiety: Thinking about quitting "forever" can induce anxiety and make the task seem impossible. By concentrating on the present moment, you reduce this overwhelming sense of pressure and make the process feel more achievable.

Building resilience: Every moment you successfully navigate without giving in to your cravings builds your resilience and confidence. These small victories accumulate, reinforcing your ability to stay smoke-free.

Why taking one day at a time matters?

Short-term goals: Setting daily goals can provide a sense of accomplishment and progress. Each day you go without smoking or vaping is a step closer to your long-term goal of being smoke-free. Reward yourself for each day you remain smoke-free. Recognize and celebrate these small victories as they contribute to your overall success.

Forming new habits: It takes time to form new, healthy habits. By focusing on each day as it comes, you can gradually replace the habit of smoking or vaping with positive activities and routines.

Mental and emotional health: Quitting smoking or vaping is a major lifestyle change that can bring about significant emotional highs and lows. By taking it one day at a time, you allow yourself the space to process these changes and adjust your coping strategies as needed. Lean on friends, family, or support groups who can help keep you motivated and provide encouragement day by day.

Preventing relapse: Relapses often happen when individuals feel overwhelmed by the idea of never smoking or vaping again. By keeping your focus on staying smoke-free just for today, you make it easier to maintain your commitment and avoid feeling defeated. Write down your thoughts, challenges, and victories each day. This can provide perspective and reinforce your progress.

By taking one moment at a time and one day at a time, you break down the larger challenge of quitting smoking or vaping into manageable, achievable parts. This approach not only makes the process less daunting but also builds the foundation for long-term success in leading a smoke-free life.